NURSING PARTNERSHIP CENTERS ON HEALTH DISPARITIES

Release Date:  December 6, 2001

RFA:  RFA-NR-02-004

National Institute of Nursing Research
 (http://www.ninr.nih.gov)
National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities
 (http://ncmhd.nih.gov)

Letter of Intent Receipt Date:  April 15, 2002
Application Receipt Date:       May 13, 2002

PURPOSE

The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) and the National Center on 
Minority Health and Health Disparities (NCMHD) invite applications for 
Nursing Partnership Centers on Health Disparities (P20). These Center grants 
build on a previous initiative "Building Capacity for Nursing Research Health 
Disparities" collaboratively developed by NINR and the NCMHD and piloted in 
NINR's extramural research program. The purpose of this initiative is to 
foster development of nursing partnerships between researchers, faculty, and 
students at Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) and institutions with 
established health disparity research programs.  The goal is to integrate and 
take maximum advantage of the respective experiences and expertise.  This 
award seeks to (1) expand the cadre of nurse researchers involved in minority 
health or health disparities research, (2) increase the number of research 
projects aimed at eliminating health disparities, and (3) enhance the career 
development of potential minority nurse investigators. The Nursing 
Partnership Centers on Health Disparities is targeted to schools of nursing. 

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2010

The Public Health Service (PHS) is committed to achieving the health 
promotion and disease prevention objectives of "Healthy People 2010," a PHS-
led national activity for setting priority areas.  This Request for 
Applications (RFA), Nursing Partnership Centers on Health Disparities, is 
related to one or more of the priority areas.  Potential applicants may 
obtain a copy of "Healthy People 2010" at http://www.health.gov/healthypeople/.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Majority institutions eligible for the Nursing Partnership Centers on Health 
Disparities are those nursing schools/colleges/departments with established 
programs of health disparities research, primarily institutions that have 
been major recipients of DHHS/NIH research support. Thus, eligible majority 
institutions must have at least 2 health disparity research projects funded 
by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) from selected 
mechanisms (especially R01 and R15 NIH research grants) or comparable peer 
reviewed research projects (including those funded by State governments or 
private foundations).  Furthermore, these funded projects must have active 
funding through at least September 30, 2003.  Details of the grant number, 
title, PI, project period, and funding institution must be carefully 
delineated in the application.

Minority-Serving Institutions with nursing schools/colleges/departments 
(MSIs) will partner with these majority institutions and develop a joint 
application.  Qualifying MSIs are either in the United States or in 
territories under U.S. jurisdiction and are defined as those in which 
students of minority groups who are underrepresented in nursing research 
(e.g., African American, Hispanic, Native American, Alaskan Native, Native 
Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, Asian American, and Philippine nurses) comprise a 
significant proportion of the enrollment and that have a track record of 
commitment to the special encouragement of minority faculty, students, and 
investigators.  Eligible MSIs include but are not limited to those listed at 
the following website address:  http://www.sciencewise.com/.  A 
description of the characteristics used to qualify as a MSI should be 
included in the application.

Each partnership must be submitted as two applications, one from the majority 
institution and one from the MSI.  Each application must contain the 
following institution-specific components: (1) Application face page; (2) 
Table of Contents; (3) Detailed first year 12-month budget, multi-year 
composite budget, and budget justification for each core and pilot study; (4) 
Resources page; (5) Checklist page; and (6) Personal Data page.  In addition, 
the following components will be identical in each application: (1) Form page 
2 [Description, Performance Sites, and Key Personnel]; (2) An overall multi-
year composite budget reflecting the entire request; (3) Biographical 
sketches [for all key personnel]; and (4) Research Plan.  The partnering 
institutions' applications will be reviewed together and will receive the 
same priority score from the study section. Institutions, whether majority or 
MSI, may submit only one (1) application. Linkage with at least one minority 
serving institution is required; a majority institution may link with more 
than one MSI, but careful planning is advised. 

MECHANISM OF SUPPORT

This RFA will use the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Exploratory Center 
Grant mechanism (P20). The purpose of this mechanism is to support planning 
for new programs, expansion or modification of existing resources, and 
feasibility studies to explore various approaches to developing minority 
health/health disparities research programs that address areas consistent 
with the missions of NINR and NCMHD. Responsibility for the planning, 
direction, and execution of the proposed Partnership Center project will be 
solely that of the Principal Investigators on behalf of the institutions. 

The Exploratory Center must include an administrative core, a pilot/ 
feasibility research core, a research mentoring core, and an evaluation plan.  
Other cores, such as a research outreach/dissemination core, are optional. 

FUNDS AVAILABLE

The NINR and NCMHD intend to commit approximately $3 million in FY 2002 to 
fund 6-7 partnerships (12-14 awards) in response to this RFA. The total 
project period for applications submitted in response to this RFA may not 
exceed five (5) years.  The direct costs of the two (or more) partnering 
applications together cannot exceed $300,000 per year; 3% escalation is 
permitted for the outyears.  

Because the nature and scope of the proposed research and center activities 
may vary, it is anticipated that the size of each award will also vary. 
Although the financial plans of the NINR and NCMHD provide support for this 
program, awards pursuant to this RFA are contingent upon the availability of 
funds and the receipt of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. 
This RFA is a one-time solicitation. It has not been determined at this time 
whether the P20 awards will be renewable. The anticipated award date is 
September 30, 2002.

Allowable costs may include items such as administrative costs for managing 
the partnership centers; for example, salary for key personnel, travel, 
equipment and supplies to support an administrative structure; workshops, 
seminars, and other forms of communication to develop and implement center 
objectives; activities to support the mentoring of minority investigators; 
and funds to implement selected pilot projects. Please contact the grants 
management officer listed under Inquiries for other questions regarding 
fiscal matters.

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES

Background

Although the population diversity in contemporary America is one of its 
greatest assets, the richness of this feature is overshadowed by the sobering 
reality of the disproportionate burden of disease and illness that is borne 
by racial and ethnic minority populations.  Compelling evidence of the 
disparate health status of America's racial and ethnic minority populations 
is documented in the form of shorter life expectancies, higher rates of 
cancer, birth defects, infant mortality, asthma, diabetes, and cardiovascular 
disease.  While it cannot be said with certainty why health disparities 
exist, it is reasonable to expect that differential incidences of disease and 
health outcomes result from the interaction of a plethora of factors in 
complex and unsuspecting ways.  These factors include environmental 
exposures, genetic variations and/or underlying biological, ethnic and 
familial factors; specific health behaviors; discrimination in patient-
provider interactions; psychosocial and socio-cultural factors; and 
socioeconomic (SES) related factors such as differential access to health 
care.  Clearly, the soundest investment that can be made for the present and 
immediate future is increasing the capacity for health disparities research 
and at the same time increasing the support of research aimed at elucidating 
the etiology of health disparities and developing new diagnostics, treatment, 
and prevention strategies.  Accordingly, the focus of this initiative will be 
on exploring opportunities for increasing the capacity for nursing research 
in health disparities.  The strategy is to encourage the formation of 
minority/majority institution partnerships aimed at increasing the number of 
nurse researchers with an interest in minority health and health disparities 
research.

The NINR and the NCMHD have historically supported health disparities 
research and related minority health initiatives.  NINR currently funds a 
number of core center (P30s) and exploratory center (P20s) grants, which are 
designed to facilitate the growth of research infrastructure by centralizing 
resources and facilities to support key areas of nursing inquiry that 
establish a scientific basis for individuals across the life span. Several of 
these Centers also emphasize minority health and health disparities topics, 
consistent with the scientific area of inquiry that guides the activities of 
the Center.  These include Centers that focus on health promotion, 
preventing/managing chronic illness, gerontological nursing, vulnerable 
populations, quality of life, self-management interventions, and nursing 
outcomes research.  NINR's Core Centers were all awarded one-year 
administrative supplements to support activities related to minority health 
and health disparities.  In addition, several P30 Centers and R01 grantees 
participated in a previous partnership initiative "Building Capacity for 
Nursing Research Health Disparities," a collaboration between NINR and NCMHD. 
The goal of these pilot activities was to build capacity for nursing research 
on health disparities by supporting partnerships between schools of nursing 
in majority institutions and minority institutions/organizations.  These 
pilots included a diverse number of projects focused on enhancing the 
research career development of minority undergraduate and graduate students 
and enhancing the research skills of faculty from both the majority and 
minority institutions.  

For purposes of this solicitation, the following definitions are taken 
directly from the NIH Comprehensive Plan to Reduce or Eliminate Health 
Disparities.  A Health Disparity Population is one where a significant 
disparity has been identified in the overall rate of disease incidence, 
prevalence, morbidity, mortality, and survival rates in the population as 
compared to the health status of the general population. Any additional 
population may be included among the health disparity populations should the 
NCMHD Director, after consultation with the Director of the Agency for 
Healthcare Research and Quality, confirm a significant disparity in the 
overall rate of disease incidence, prevalence, morbidity, mortality, and 
survival rate in that population when compared to the health status of the 
general population. The Medically Underserved is a health disparity 
population, and in particular refers to individuals who live in geographical 
areas where the Index of Medical Underservice is 62 or less.  Minority 
Population refers to racial and ethnic minority groups that usually include 
African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Hawaiian 
Islanders, and Asian Pacific Islanders.  
	
	Additional definitions of health disparity and minority health are also 
provided in this strategic plan.  Health disparity research is basic, 
clinical and behavioral studies on health conditions including diseases, 
disorders, and such other conditions that are unique to, more serious, or 
more prevalent in sub-populations that are economically disadvantaged and 
medically underserved [and confirmed by the Agency for Healthcare Research 
and Quality as health disparity groups]. Minority health research is basic, 
clinical and behavioral studies including research to prevent, diagnose, and 
treat such minority health conditions as diseases, disorders, and other 
conditions that are unique to, more serious in, or more prevalent in racial 
and ethnic minorities or for which the factors of medical risks or types of 
intervention may be different for such population groups. 

The Nursing Partnership Centers on Health Disparities RFA will facilitate 
infrastructure development at schools of nursing for (1) expanding the cadre 
of nurse researchers involved in minority health or health disparities 
research, (2) increasing the number of research projects aimed at eliminating 
health disparities, and (3) enhancing the career development of potential 
minority nurse investigators.  These components are critical to efforts 
devoted to eliminating health disparities.  Four broad areas are targeted for 
infrastructure development at these new Centers:

1. Minority Health and Health Disparities Research
 
This RFA seeks research with a focus on reducing health disparities and 
improving the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minority populations 
and/or other health disparity groups.  Applicants should select scientific 
areas of inquiry related to minority health/health disparities based on a 
conceptually sound integration of currently funded projects in the research 
base. Applications should contain innovative ideas consistent with NINR's 
mission and use sound methodologies.  Applicants are encouraged to consider 
the following broad topical areas that have been identified as specific areas 
of scientific opportunity while maintaining the focus on minority health and 
health disparities. These suggestions provide possible examples, but are not 
to be considered required or all-inclusive of possible center topics: 

o Chronic illness experiences, such as managing symptoms, avoiding 
complications of disease and disability, supporting family caregivers, 
promoting adherence and self-management activities, and promoting healthy 
behaviors within the context of the chronic condition.  

o Cultural and ethnic considerations in health and illness, including 
culturally sensitive interventions to decrease health disparities among 
groups by focusing upon health promotion activities and chronic illness 
management strategies.

o End of life research, focusing on clinical management of physical and 
psychological symptom management, communication, ethics and clinical 
decision-making, caregiver support, and care delivery issues. 

o Health promotion and disease prevention research, particularly as it 
relates to lifestyle changes and healthy behavior maintenance across the 
lifespan.  

o Implications of genetic advances, including reducing factors that increase 
risk of disease, issues related to genetic screening, and subsequent gene 
therapy techniques.

o Quality of life and quality of care, to include cost savings for the 
patient, health care system, and society.

o Symptom management of illness and treatment, such as pain, cognitive 
impairment, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, and sleep problems.

o Telehealth interventions and monitoring or other emerging technologies to 
promote patient education for competent self-management and to optimize the 
effectiveness of treatment.

2.  Minority Health and Health Disparities Research Mentoring and Development

Research mentoring/development initiatives should represent true 
collaborations across institutional boundaries. Participants may include 
racial and ethnic minorities or individuals from other health disparity 
groups that reside in geographical regions that experience documented 
disparities in health (e.g., individuals from regions such as Appalachia or 
rural areas that have economically disadvantaged populations). Research 
mentoring components may have an undergraduate, graduate student, post-
doctoral, or junior faculty focus or a combination of one or more. The major 
objective of the mentoring experience should be to prepare nurse researchers 
to address health disparities noted among racial ethnic minority and 
underserved populations.    

Undergraduate/Graduate Students. Research mentoring components for students 
may include establishing academic term and/or summer mentoring opportunities. 
For example, new research mentoring programs might provide 
undergraduate/graduate students in MSIs with opportunities to fulfill their 
research requirements in research settings at the partner institution.  Also, 
institutions involved in the original initiative "Building Capacity for 
Nursing Research in Health Disparities" may wish to expand their programs and 
develop long-term initiatives related to research career development of 
undergraduate and graduate students.  Activities to stimulate early entry 
into research careers may also be a fruitful area to pursue.

Postdoctoral Experiences. Research mentoring components may also support 
postdoctoral career development for nurses from racial and ethnic minority 
subpopulations or other health disparity subpopulations. Given the paucity of 
minority individuals prepared at the postdoctoral level, including 
opportunities for postdoctoral students will help to fulfill an important 
gap. 

Faculty. Mentored research components may be developed for minority faculty 
at the partnering institutions.
  
3. Minority Health and Health Disparities Education

An educational component could focus on efforts to augment activities at the 
MSI and/or majority partner institution that would apprise and culturally 
sensitize undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral trainees in 
nursing on the various issues and opportunities related to reducing health 
disparities. Additional educational activities may include a focus on 
designing appropriate culturally sensitive research approaches and methods 
for use when conducting research with racial/ethnic minorities and 
underserved populations. 

4. Research Outreach/Research Dissemination

Research mentoring may include activities to assist faculty and students at 
both institutions in developing skills and expertise to successfully conduct 
health disparities research involving community partnerships. For example, 
assisting faculty and students in designing and implementing an evaluation 
plan to assess the efficacy of recruitment and retention strategies; 
developing skills in establishing and sustaining research partnerships with 
target communities; and identifying and pursuing venues for disseminating 
research findings to participants, community groups, and professional 
audiences, may be fruitful areas to pursue.   

Special Requirements

The Center must be an identifiable organizational unit within the nursing 
school/college/department of each partnering institution.  The Principal 
Investigator for each partnering institution's application must be a Center 
Co-Director on the partnering application.  These two individuals will 
together serve as the key figures in the organization, administration, and 
management of the Center activities. These individuals should be experienced 
in activities to coordinate, integrate, and provide guidance in the 
establishment of programs in the center scientific area of inquiry. The Co-
Directors must make an appropriate time commitment. Clear lines of authority 
and sanction by the appropriate institutional officials must be specified.

CORES & EVALUATION PLAN

A core is a shared central facility or other resource, designed to enhance 
the productivity and in other ways benefit faculty and students at the 
partnering institutions to accomplish stated goals and objectives. The 
Nursing Partnership Centers on Health Disparities must include the following: 
(1) Administrative Core, (2) Pilot/Feasibility Research Core, (3) Research 
Mentoring Core, and (4) Evaluation Plan.  Other cores, such as a Research 
Outreach/Dissemination Core, are optional, and may be added to help 
facilitate the achievement of goals and objectives outlined in the 
application.  Each core should be directed by an investigator/faculty with 
substantial expertise related to the core. An important consideration is the 
degree to which core facilities will be utilized by and benefit individuals' 
ongoing and/or proposed projects and Center investigators, and will assist in 
the development of the activities related to minority health and health 
disparities. 

It is not sufficient for the applicant to merely identify resources to be 
shared between the institutions. Rather, the applicant must demonstrate 
exactly how each core would augment or enhance the present capabilities of 
the investigators/faculty/students at both institutions. In addition, after 
an award is made, the NINR will require documentation in annual progress 
reports that sharing of resources and activities has been achieved. 

In the application, the description of each core is limited to 25 pages.

Administrative Core (Mandatory)

An Administrative Core is mandatory for all Centers and should manage the 
overall activities of the Center as well as assist in the development and 
coordination of efforts between the Center and the partnering institution.  
Its description should include the following:

1.  A specified Director (a Co-Director at the partnering institution may 
also be designated);
2.  A description of the administrative structure; and
3.  A general description of activities and institutional support.

It is expected that the Center Administrative structure will accomplish the 
following:

1.  Coordinate and oversee the administrative functions between the majority 
institution and partnering institution;
2.  Review utilization of funds, including funds for pilot/feasibility 
research studies, research mentoring, and  any other core activities;
3.  Manage the shared resources of the Center, such as research and research 
mentoring resources; and
4.  Advise the Center Co-Directors on the activities of the Center.

While the final administrative structure of the Center will, for the most 
part, be left to the discretion of the applicant institutions, NIH's 
experience has demonstrated that the effective development of Center programs 
requires interaction among the Co-Directors, the core leaders, the Principal 
Investigators of the research projects, appropriate institutional 
administrative personnel, and the staff of the awarding agency. To facilitate 
communication among the Center staffs, partnering institutions, and the NINR, 
NINR expects that each Center application must include funds for one (1) 
individual (the Center Director or Co-Director) to travel to an annual 
meeting in Bethesda, Maryland.  In addition, the first year budget should 
include funds for the business/fiscal person from each institution to attend 
the annual meeting in Bethesda, MD.

An Executive Committee, consisting of the heads of all cores, representatives 
from the partnering institutions, and appropriate business officials, should 
be established to assist the Director and Co-Director in the allocation of 
Center funds, the identification and selection of key personnel, and the 
planning and execution of the center activities.

The complex nature of administrative requirements of the Center will 
necessitate the assistance of a person with business management expertise.  
It is important that such an official be identified and directly involved 
with the fiscal aspects of each institution's application and grant. An 
appropriate amount of this individual's time and effort should be committed 
for this purpose.  The institutional business officials should be members of 
the Executive Committee.  While budget formulation and planning will 
undoubtedly begin with the Director in collaboration with the scientific 
staff, the business officials should be involved in the process, provide 
consultation in matters of fiscal administration, and evaluate such issues as 
equipment on hand versus that requested for the core facilities. 

An External Advisory Committee should be established and composed of 
scientists and administrators with expertise and experiences relevant to the 
scientific program of the Center. The Advisory Committee will comprise 
individuals from the Center, the partnering institutions, and at least two 
(2) scientists from outside the institutions. This committee may also be used 
in evaluating the overall research programs of the Center, the effectiveness 
of communications within the Center, and any other activities in which 
problems arise for which expertise is required or desirable. The Advisory 
Committee should meet at least once annually. However, the nature of its 
responsibilities may require ad hoc meetings at more frequent intervals. A 
member of the NINR extramural program staff is to be invited to attend each 
meeting as an observer. 

Pilot/Feasibility Research Core (Mandatory)

The Pilot/Feasibility Research Core should develop and manage activities 
related to the selection and successful completion of pilot studies.  Its 
description should include:

1.  A specified Director (a Co-Director at the partnering institution may 
also be designated);
2.  A description of the core structure, activities, and processes; and
3.  A description of potential participants in future pilot/feasibility 
studies.

Pilot/feasibility research studies are mandatory for the Center application. 
These are intended to facilitate eligible investigators and students to 
explore the feasibility of a concept and to amass sufficient data to pursue 
it through other funding mechanisms.  The funds provide modest research 
support for a limited time (one year or two years maximum, with clear 
justification for the length of the study).  Eligible investigators include:

1.  A new investigator who has not been a Principal Investigator in the past, 
or who is not currently funded by a DHHS research project grant (e.g., RO1 or 
R15);  
2.  Graduate students with an interest in conducting minority health/health 
disparities research; and
3.  An established investigator who wishes to develop skill and expertise in 
conducting minority health/health disparities research, and for whom this 
area represents a clear and distinct departure from his/her ongoing research 
interests.

Applications must propose a minimum of two (2) and a maximum of four (4) 
pilot and/or feasibility studies to be carried out during the first year. The 
reviewers must determine a minimum of two pilot/feasibility studies 
acceptable; each pilot study must include participants from each partnering 
institution. Standard guidelines for IRB/IACUC approval and educational 
training for the protection of human subjects apply. The theoretical basis 
for the pilot and/or feasibility study must be clearly explicated.  Each 
pilot and/or feasibility study is limited to 10 pages of description for the 
Research Plan, Sections a. through d., which should delineate the question 
being asked, detail the procedures to be followed, and discuss how the data 
will be analyzed. The application must indicate how the proposed 
pilot/feasibility study addresses a minority health or health disparities 
topic. 

Subsequent pilot/feasibility studies, a minimum of three (3) ongoing each 
year, will be developed during the course of the award. A description of how 
the pilot/feasibility studies will be reviewed and selected in the future 
must be provided. Results of each pilot and/or feasibility study must be 
included in the Center's annual progress reports to NINR. 

Research Mentoring Core (Mandatory)

A research mentoring core is mandatory for all Center applications. This core 
is intended to assist faculty and students at both institutions in developing 
skill and expertise in conducting health disparities research involving 
minority and underserved communities. Research mentoring components may have 
an undergraduate, graduate student, post-doctoral, or junior faculty focus, 
or may target one or more of these groups. Research mentoring initiatives 
should represent true collaborations that function across institutional 
boundaries. The description of the Research Mentoring Core should include:

1.  A specified Director (a Co-Director at the partnering institution may 
also be designated);
2.  A description of potential research projects;
3.  A general description of mentoring activities and opportunities and 
related resources to support research mentoring; and
4.  A general description of potential participants.    

The Research Mentoring Core is expected to: 

1.  Develop, implement, and evaluate research activities related to 
conducting health disparities research for participants at both institutions;
2.  Provide mentoring on issues related to developing cultural competence in 
nursing research; and
3.  Increase the number of potential minority nurse investigators.  

Research Outreach/Dissemination Core (Optional)

A research outreach/dissemination core is optional for Center applications. 
This core is intended to assist faculty and students at both institutions in 
developing skill and expertise in implementing appropriate outreach needed to 
conduct health disparities research involving minority and underserved 
communities, and in disseminating the results of such research to diverse 
audiences including the communities involved. The description of this Core 
should include:

1.  A specified Director (a Co-Director at the partnering institution may 
also be designated);
2.  A community liaison committee;
3.  A description of the activities and institutional support; and 
4.  A general description of potential outreach linkages.  

The Research Outreach/Dissemination Core is expected to:

1.  Identify and coordinate activities related to successfully conducting and 
evaluating health disparities research involving community partnerships;
2.  Identify and expand resources related to conducting community-based or 
community partnered research to reduce health disparities;  
3.  Develop skill and expertise in identifying and pursuing various venues 
for disseminating research findings including targeted communities and public 
and professional audiences; and 
4.  Identify strategies and opportunities to engage targeted communities in 
using research findings to enhance their health and well-being.

Evaluation Plan (Mandatory)

A plan for evaluating progress toward meeting the aims and goals of all cores 
and the overall Center is required. This plan should include the specific 
criteria and methods that will be used for the evaluation. The plan should 
specify the types of evaluation information that will be submitted in the 
Center's annual progress report. 

INCLUSION OF WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

It is the policy of the NIH that women and members of minority groups and 
their sub-populations must be included in all NIH-supported clinical research 
projects unless a clear and compelling justification is provided indicating 
that inclusion is inappropriate with respect to the health of the subjects or 
the purpose of the research. This policy results from the NIH Revitalization 
Act of 1993 (Section 492B of Public Law 103-43).

All investigators proposing clinical research should read the AMENDMENT "NIH 
Guidelines for Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical 
Research - Amended, October, 2001," published in the NIH Guide for Grants and 
Contracts on October 9, 2001 
(http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-02-001.html); 
a complete copy of the updated Guidelines are available at 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/women_min/guidelines_amended_10_2001.htm.  
The amended policy incorporates: the use of an NIH definition of 
clinical research; updated racial and ethnic categories in compliance with 
the new OMB standards; clarification of language governing NIH-defined Phase 
III clinical trials consistent with the new PHS Form 398; and updated roles 
and responsibilities of NIH staff and the extramural community.  The policy 
continues to require for all NIH-defined Phase III clinical trials that: a) 
all applications or proposals and/or protocols must provide a description of 
plans to conduct analyses, as appropriate, to address differences by 
sex/gender and/or racial/ethnic groups, including subgroups if applicable; 
and b) investigators must report annual accrual and progress in conducting 
analyses, as appropriate, by sex/gender and/or racial/ethnic group 
differences.

INCLUSION OF CHILDREN AS PARTICIPANTS IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

It is the policy of NIH that children (i.e., individuals under the age of 21) 
must be included in all human subjects research, conducted or supported by 
the NIH, unless there are scientific and ethical reasons not to include them.  
This policy applies to all initial (Type 1) applications submitted for 
receipt dates after October 1, 1998.

All investigators proposing research involving human subjects should read the 
"NIH Policy and Guidelines" on the Inclusion of Children as Participants in 
Research Involving Human Subjects that was published in the NIH Guide for 
Grants and Contracts, March 6, 1998, and is available at the following URL 
address:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/not98-024.html.

Investigators also may obtain copies of these policies from the program staff 
listed under INQUIRIES.  Program staff may also provide additional relevant 
information concerning the policy.

REQUIRED EDUCATION ON THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECT PARTICIPANTS

NIH policy requires education on the protection of human subject participants 
for all investigators submitting NIH proposals for research involving human 
subjects.  This policy announcement is found in the NIH Guide for Grants and 
Contracts Announcement dated June 5, 2000, at the following website: 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-00-039.html.

URLS IN NIH GRANT APPLICATIONS OR APPENDICES

All applications and proposals for NIH funding must be self-contained within 
specified page limitations.  Unless otherwise specified in an NIH 
solicitation, Internet addresses (URLs) should not be used to provide 
information necessary to the review because reviewers are under no obligation 
to view the Internet sites.  Reviewers are cautioned that their anonymity may 
be compromised when they directly access an Internet site.

PUBLIC ACCESS TO RESEARCH DATA THROUGH THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-110 has been revised to 
provide public access to research data through the Freedom of Information Act 
(FOIA) under some circumstances.  Data that are (1) first produced in a 
project that is supported in whole or in part with Federal funds and (2) 
cited publicly and officially by a Federal agency in support of an action 
that has the force and effect of law (i.e., a regulation) may be accessed 
through FOIA.  It is important for applicants to understand the basic scope 
of this amendment.  NIH has provided guidance at:
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/policy/a110/a110_guidance_dec1999.htm.

Applicants may wish to place data collected under this RFA in a public 
archive, which can provide protections for the data and manage the 
distribution for an indefinite period of time.  If so, the application should 
include a description of the archiving plan in the study design and include 
information about this in the budget justification section of the 
application. In addition, applicants should think about how to structure 
informed consent statements and other human subjects procedures given the 
potential for wider use of data collected under this award.

LETTER OF INTENT

Prospective applicants are asked to submit a letter of intent that includes a 
descriptive title of the proposed research center, the name, address, and 
telephone number of the Principal Investigator at each partnering 
institution, the identities of other key personnel and participating 
institutions, and the number and title of the RFA in response to which the 
application may be submitted.  Only one (1) letter of intent per partnership 
is requested.  Although a letter of intent is not required, is not binding, 
and does not enter into the review of a subsequent application, the 
information that it contains allows NINR staff to estimate the potential 
review workload and plan the review.

The letter of intent is to be sent by the letter of intent receipt date 
listed to:

Dr. John E. Richters 
Chief, Office of Review 
National Institute of Nursing Research
Building 45, Room 3AN-12
45 Center Drive, MSC 6300
Bethesda, MD  20892-6300
Telephone:  (301) 594-5971 
FAX:  (301) 451-5645
e-mail:  jrichters@nih.gov

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

The PHS 398 research grant application instructions and forms (rev. 5/2001) 
at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/phs398/phs398.html must be used in 
applying for these grants. This version of the PHS 398 is available in an 
interactive, searchable format.  For further assistance contact GrantsInfo, 
Telephone 301/435-0714, Email:  GrantsInfo@nih.gov.

The RFA label available in the PHS 398 (rev. 5/2001) application form must be 
affixed to the bottom of the face page of the application.  Type the RFA 
number on the label.  Failure to use this label could result in delayed 
processing of the application such that it may not reach the review committee 
in time for review.  In addition, the RFA title and number must be typed on 
line 2 of the face page of the application form and the YES box must be 
marked. The RFA label is also available at: 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/phs398/label-bk.pdf.

Submit a signed, typewritten original of the application, including the 
Checklist, and three signed, photocopies, in one package to:

CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC REVIEW
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
6701 ROCKLEDGE DRIVE, ROOM 1040, MSC 7710
BETHESDA, MD  20892-7710
BETHESDA, MD  20817 (for express/courier service)

At the time of submission, two additional copies of the application must be 
sent to:

Dr. John E. Richters 
Chief, Office of Review 
National Institute of Nursing Research
Building 45, Room 3AN-12
45 Center Drive, MSC 6300
Bethesda, MD  20892-6300
Telephone:  (301) 594-5971 
FAX:  (301) 451-5645
e-mail:  jrichters@nih.gov

Applications must be received by the application receipt date listed in the 
heading of this RFA.  If an application is received after that date, it will 
be returned to the applicant without review.
  
The Center for Scientific Review (CSR) will not accept any application in 
response to this RFA that is essentially the same as one currently pending 
initial review, unless the applicant withdraws the pending application.  The 
CSR will not accept any application that is essentially the same as one 
already reviewed. This does not preclude the submission of substantial 
revisions of applications already reviewed, but such applications must 
include an Introduction addressing the previous critique.

The instructions for the Form PHS 398 do not entirely apply to the submission 
of these P20 grant applications.  Accordingly, applicants are strongly 
encouraged to follow the SUPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTIONS below, which have been 
adapted to accommodate the PHS 398 and the special requirements of this RFA.  
These instructions include all of the information that will be needed by the 
peer reviewers of these applications.  

These instructions are designed to facilitate the collaboration of the 
partnering institutions in the development of applications.  Much of the 
narrative information will be identical in each partner's application.  
However, it is critical that this narrative clearly depict each institution's 
contributions to and involvement with activities in the development and 
implementation of the proposed Nursing Partnership Center on Health 
Disparities.    

SUPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTIONS
 
1. Face Page: Use Form Page 1 as instructed in the PHS 398.  On line 1. 
provide a title that is representative of the collaboration or partnership.  
This title should be the same for both partnering applications.  For line 2. 
enter the number and title of this RFA.  Remember to affix the RFA label that 
comes with the PHS 398 to the bottom of the Face Page.

2. Description, Performance Site(s) and Key Personnel: Use Form Page 2 of the 
PHS 398 and follow the instructions provided in the PHS 398.  This page will 
be IDENTICAL IN BOTH PARTNERING APPLICATIONS. 

3. Table of Contents:  Provide a detailed Table of Contents organized as 
described below:  This differs from Form Page 3 of the PHS 398.  
 
Content								Page Number

o Face Page
o Description, Performance Sites and Key Personnel
o Table of Contents, including List of all Tables and Figures
o Detailed Budget for Initial Budget Period 
o Budget for Entire Proposed Project Period 
o Overall Budget for Entire Proposed Project Period 
o Budgets Pertaining to Consortium/Contractual Arrangements (if applicable) 
o Budget Justification Pertaining to Consortium/Contractual Arrangements (if 
applicable) 
o Biographical Sketch of the Principal Investigator 
o Biographical Sketch of the Center Co-Director from the Partnering 
Institution(s)
o Biographical Sketches of All Professional Personnel and Pilot Investigators
o List of participating faculty/members of the Center  
o Resources 
o Overview of Center and Description of Research Base
o Administrative Core, Budget, and Budget Justification
o Pilot/Feasibility Research Core, Budget, and Budget Justification
o Research Mentoring Core, Budget, and Budget Justification
o Optional Core(s), Budget, and Budget Justification
o References
o Letters of Support
o Pilot/Feasibility Study #1
o Pilot/Feasibility Study #2
o Pilot/Feasibility Study #3 (optional)
o Pilot/Feasibility Study #4 (optional)
o Consortium/Contractual Arrangements
o Checklist
o Appendix Material

4. Detailed Budget for Initial Budget Period: Use Form Page 4 of the PHS 398 
application kit.  This budget should include direct costs for the APPLICANT 
INSTITUTION ONLY. 

5. Budget for Entire Proposed Project Period:  Use Form Page 5 of the PHS 398 
application kit.  This budget should include direct costs for the APPLICANT 
INSTITUTION ONLY, for all years requested.  Future pilot/feasibility studies 
to be identified should be budgeted as a block under "Other Expenses" in the 
Pilot/Feasibility Research Core.  

6. Overall Budget for Entire Proposed Project Period:  Use Form Page 5 of the 
PHS 398 application kit.  This budget should include all direct costs for 
both partnering institutions, for all years requested.   This page will be 
IDENTICAL IN BOTH PARTNERING APPLICATIONS. 

7. Budgets Pertaining to Consortium/Contractual Arrangements:  Use Form Pages 
4 and 5.  These budgets are included if consortium/contractual arrangements  
are needed, and reflect the APPLICANT INSTITUTION ONLY. 

8. Budget Justification Pertaining to Consortium/Contractual Arrangements:  
if applicable.  Provide for the APPLICANT INSTITUTION ONLY. 

9. Biographical Sketch of Principal Investigator (Center Director): Use the 
Biographical Sketch Format Page of the PHS 398 and follow the instructions in 
the application kit.  

10. Biographical Sketch of Center Co-Director from the Partnering 
Institution: Use the Biographical Sketch Format Page of the PHS 398 and 
follow the instructions in the application kit.  

11. Biographical Sketches of All Professional Personnel and Pilot 
Investigators:  Use the Biographical Sketch Format Page of the PHS 398 as 
above.  This section should include all professional personnel from both 
partnering institutions who are listed with a percent effort, including 
consultants and members of the External Advisory Committee.  Biographical 
sketches are also required for those who are listed in the research base. 
Arrange the biographical sketches alphabetically.  These pages should not be 
duplicated in the individual component cores or pilots. This section will be 
IDENTICAL IN BOTH PARTNERING APPLICATIONS. 
	
12. Complete list (or table) of participating faculty/members of the Center 
and the External Advisory Committee:  List members alphabetically by name, 
and include for each individual his/her degree, institution and department 
affiliation or equivalent, and research or other interest (e.g., research 
area, training, or education).  This section will be IDENTICAL IN BOTH 
PARTNERING APPLICATIONS. 

13. Resources:  Using Resources Format Page in the PHS 398 application kit, 
describe the relevant resources for the APPLICANT INSTITUTION ONLY.  

14. Overview of Center and Description of Research Base:  This section (25 
pages maximum) will be IDENTICAL IN BOTH PARTNERING APPLICATIONS. 

The Specific Aims of the proposed center's (a) research, (b) mentoring, and 
(c) infrastructure development objectives should state concisely the 
scientific area of inquiry related to minority health/health disparities that 
will serve as the focus for the Center. 
 
The Background and Significance section should include a critical review and 
synthesis of relevant research, theory, and methods to establish the 
scientific and public health significance of the proposed Center's research, 
mentoring, and infrastructure objectives as described under Specific Aims.  
It should also provide a detailed rationale and justification for the 
proposed institutional partnership and shared resources, with emphasis on how 
each institution will contribute to and benefit from the proposed Center.  
Plans to develop productive collaborations among Center investigators at the 
partnering institutions should be highlighted, and criteria for designating 
an investigator as a Center participant (investigator) should be defined in 
terms of the responsibilities and privileges associated with a Center 
investigator.  

The Preliminary Studies section should provide a detailed description and 
discussion of funded research projects that constitute the proposed 
partnership center's Research Base, and indicate how these studies support 
the selected scientific theme.  It is helpful to present the Research Base 
studies in table format, specifying for each funded study (a) the title and 
grant number, (b) funding organization, (c) period of committed support, (d) 
direct costs for project period, (e) current year annual direct costs, (f) 
names and institutional affiliations of the principal investigator and co-
investigators, and (g) principal investigator's percent of committed effort.   
The Research Base studies and related resources should be described and 
discussed in sufficient detail to support an evaluation of their (a) 
relevance to minority-health/health disparities issues, and (b) strengths and 
limitations as a scientific foundation for pursuing the Specific Aims of the 
proposed partnership center.  Applicants may want to provide similar tables 
depicting pending support for research projects related to minority 
health/health disparities and current support for research projects unrelated 
to minority health/health disparities.  The focus and interrelationships of 
ongoing research and research interests for Center investigators at both 
partnering institutions should be documented.  
 
The Overview should also include a description of the qualifications of the 
Center Director and Co-Director, and general plans for collaboration between 
the partnering institutions (including existing Centers or available 
resources).  

15. Administrative Core: 

Provide a Detailed Budget, a Budget for Entire Proposed Project Period, and 
Budget Justification for the Administrative Core: Use Form Pages 4 and 5 of 
the PHS 398 application kit.  These should reflect direct costs for the 
APPLICANT INSTITUTION ONLY. 

The narrative section (25 pages maximum) will be IDENTICAL IN BOTH PARTNERING 
APPLICATIONS.  Provide a detailed description and discussion of the 
objectives, functions, organizational infrastructure, administrative 
procedures, key personnel (including the Core Director), and resources of the 
Administrative Core within the context of the overall center. The description 
should depict the relationships and lines of authority by appropriate 
officials at both partnering institutions; committee structures and 
membership; and plans for assistance of a business official for fiscal 
matters.  A diagram of the interactions to be fostered by the Center is 
useful in depicting proposed interrelationships and collaborations between 
institutions, and among other institutional resources.  Provide a general 
overall description of facilities and institutional commitment, including 
letter(s) of institutional commitment, and if applicable, a letter from the 
General Clinical Research Center Director.  The composition and functions of 
the External Advisory Committee should be delineated.  

Also describe the criteria, methods, and other components of the 
comprehensive evaluation plan for the Center.   

16. Pilot/Feasibility Research Core: 

Provide a Detailed Budget, a Budget for Entire Proposed Project Period, and 
Budget Justification for the Pilot/Feasibility Research Core: Use Form Pages 
4 and 5 of the PHS 398 application kit.  These should reflect direct costs 
for the APPLICANT INSTITUTION ONLY. 

The narrative section (25 pages maximum) will be IDENTICAL IN BOTH PARTNERING 
APPLICATIONS.  Provide a detailed description and discussion of the 
objectives, functions, organizational infrastructure, administrative 
procedures, key personnel (including the Core Director), and resources of the 
Pilot/Feasibility Research Core within the context of the overall center. The 
description should portray the relationships and lines of authority at both 
partnering institutions and any committee structures and membership.  A 
detailed description of Core activities designed to facilitate the 
development and completion of joint pilot/feasibility studies should be 
provided, including the process used for selecting pilot studies included in 
this application, and for selecting future pilot studies.  

17. Research Mentoring Core  

Provide a Detailed Budget, a Budget for Entire Proposed Project Period, and 
Budget Justification for the Research Mentoring Core: Use Form Pages 4 and 5 
of the PHS 398 application kit.  These should reflect direct costs for the 
APPLICANT INSTITUTION ONLY. 

The narrative section (25 pages maximum) will be IDENTICAL IN BOTH PARTNERING 
APPLICATIONS.  Provide a detailed description and discussion of the 
objectives, functions, organizational infrastructure, administrative 
procedures, key personnel (including the Core Director), and resources of the 
Research Mentoring Core within the context of the overall center. The 
description should include a discussion of relationships and lines of 
authority at both partnering institutions and any committee structures and 
membership.  Also include a detailed description of Core activities, 
resources, and research opportunities designed to assist faculty and students 
in developing research skills and enhancing research career trajectories.  
Include a description of potential research mentoring participants and how 
they will benefit from core activities.  

18.  Optional Core(s):  Provide information for any optional core modeled 
after the instructions above. 

19.  References:  Follow the directions and instructions provided in the PHS 
398 application kit. This list should be IDENTICAL IN BOTH PARTNERING 
APPLICATIONS. 

20. Letters of Support:  Provide letters of support for the APPLICANT 
INSTITUTION ONLY. 

21. Pilot/Feasibility Studies:  For each proposed pilot/feasibility study, 
provide the information below.  The information for each pilot/feasibility 
study will be IDENTICAL IN BOTH PARTNERING APPLICATIONS EXCEPT FOR THE 
DETAILED BUDGET (SECOND ITEM BELOW). 

o  Description, Performance Site(s), and Key Personnel:  Use PHS 398 Form 
Page 2.
o  Detailed Budget for the Pilot/Feasibility Study for the Initial Budget 
Period: Use Form Page 4 of the PHS 398 application kit.  This budget should 
include direct costs for the APPLICANT INSTITUTION ONLY.   If the 
pilot/feasibility study is longer than one year in duration, also include 
Form Page 5 of the PHS 398 application kit, Budget for Entire Proposed 
Project Period. 
o  Detailed Budget for the Pilot/Feasibility Study for the Initial Budget 
Period: Use Form Page 4 of the PHS 398 application kit.  This budget should 
include all direct costs for BOTH PARTNERING INSTITUTIONS.   If the 
pilot/feasibility study is longer than one year in duration, also include 
Form Page 5 of the PHS 398 application kit, Budget for Entire Proposed 
Project Period. 
o  Budget Justification: Use PHS 398 Form Page 5.  This justification should 
reflect the budget from BOTH PARTNERING INSTITUTIONS, and indicate clearly 
which components are allocated to which institution.   If the 
pilot/feasibility study is longer than one year in duration, also include 
Form Page 5 of the PHS 398 application kit, Budget for Entire Proposed 
Project Period. 
o  Justification of eligibility of the principal investigator according to 
the stated criteria.
o  Justification of the study as a pilot study (including where the project 
could lead) and how the study fits into the Center's scientific area of 
inquiry.
o  Scientific proposal as outlined in PHS 398 (including justification for 
core use if applicable): (10 pages maximum) See PHS 398 application kit, 
Research Plan, sections a. through d.  
o  Information regarding human subjects or vertebrate animals as applicable.
o  Literature cited. 

22.  Consortium/Contractual Arrangements:  Follow the directions and 
instructions provided in the PHS 398 application kit.  Provide this 
information for the APPLICANT INSTITUTION ONLY.

23.  Checklist:  Use Checklist Form Page in the PHS 398 application kit, and 
complete for the APPLICANT INSTITUTION ONLY. 

24.  Appendix Material:  Follow the directions and instructions provided in 
the PHS 398 application kit.  Include information appropriate to the 
APPLICANT INSTITUTION ONLY.

25.  Personal Data on Principal Investigator/Program Director:  Use Personal 
Data Form Page in the PHS 398 application kit.  

REVIEW CONSIDERATIONS

Upon receipt, applications will be reviewed for completeness by CSR and 
responsiveness by NINR.  Incomplete and/or non-responsive applications will 
be returned to the applicant without further consideration.

Each partnership must be submitted as two applications, one from the majority 
institution and one from the MSI.  The partnering institutions will be 
reviewed together and will receive the same priority score from the study 
section. 

Applications that are complete and responsive to the RFA will be evaluated 
for scientific and technical merit by an appropriate peer review group 
convened by NINR in accordance with the review criteria stated below.  As 
part of the initial merit review, all applications will receive a written 
critique and may undergo a process in which only those applications deemed to 
have the highest scientific merit, generally the top half of the applications 
under review, are discussed, assigned a priority score, and receive a second 
level review by the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. 

REVIEW CRITERIA

The goals of NIH-supported research are to advance our understanding of 
biological systems, improve the control of disease, and enhance health.  In 
the written comments, reviewers will be asked to give careful consideration 
of the information in the SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS section of the RFA and the 
review criteria listed below in order to judge the likelihood that the 
proposed Center will have a substantial impact on the pursuit of these goals.  
Each of these criteria will be addressed and considered in assigning the 
overall score, weighting them as appropriate for each application.  Note that 
the application does not need to be strong in all categories to be judged 
likely to have major scientific impact and thus deserve a high priority 
score.  For example, an investigator may propose to carry out important work 
that by its nature is not innovative but is essential to move a field 
forward.

Overall Center Grant Application  

1.  The overall scientific merit and the potential of the research program 
for making a significant contribution to achieving the goals of the NINR and 
NCMHD. 
2.  The scientific gain from linking the research projects in a center grant, 
i.e., the degree of interrelatedness and synergism among the components of 
the Center.
3.  The qualifications of the Center Co-Directors and other key investigators 
and the commitment of participating investigators to a common goal and to 
collaboration.
4.  The adequacy of the available resources and the quality of the research 
environment.
5.  The commitment of the partnering institutions to the Center in terms of 
space, resources, administrative authority, and other necessary support, 
e.g., donated faculty time, use of equipment, and the extent to which the 
Center is recognized as a major element within the organizational structure 
of the institutions.
6.  The plans for developmental activities, including recruitment and 
expansion, insofar as the proposed research program justifies these.
7.  Evidence of prior partnering activities and documentation of the 
commitment of the institutions to this partnership. 
8.  Evidence of the extent to which the planning, organization, structure, 
and design of the proposed Center and activities reflect a genuine 
collaboration between the partners.
9.  Appropriateness of the requested budget for the work proposed.
10.  The appropriateness of distribution of the budget between the partnering 
institutions.

Research Base

1.  Focus and depth of funded investigations that are currently in progress.
2.  Presence of current and emerging collaborations and interactions among 
investigators with common research interests in minority health or health 
disparities research.
3.  Impact that funded investigators have made in their respective fields, as 
well as in the area of minority health or health disparities, as indicated by 
publications and other factors.
4.  The qualifications, experience, and commitment of the Center 
investigators responsible for the individual research projects, and their 
willingness to interact with and mentor others.
5.  The appropriateness of the investigators as participants of the Center, 
and whether their activities warrant core support.

Administrative Core 

1.  The adequacy of the Administrative core to manage the overall activities 
of the Center.
2.  The appropriateness and relevance of the proposed core and the modes of 
operation, facilities, and potential for contribution to ongoing nursing 
research and other activities at the partnering institutions.
3.  Appropriate justification for the core, including the duplication of 
existing resources or services and anticipated future use of the core.
4.  The adequacy of the multiple aspects related to the administrative 
structure for the center, including the provision of scientific and 
administrative leadership for the project; strategies to promote scientific 
planning, interaction, implementation, and evaluation; and arrangements for 
the fiscal management of the grant.
5.  The qualifications of the Director (and Co-Director if applicable) of the 
Administrative core. 
6.  The proposed composition and functions of the Executive Committee to 
support the proposed activities of the Center.  
7.  The appropriateness of the plan to evaluate Center activities.

Pilot and/or Feasibility Research Core

1.  The appropriateness and relevance of proposed Core activities to 
facilitate successful pilot/feasibility studies.
2.  Evidence of a strong commitment to, and plans to support, pilot 
investigators in successful completion of their studies.
3.  The qualifications of the Director (and Co-Director if applicable) of the 
Pilot and/or Feasibility Research Core.
4.  The process for selecting the pilot/feasibility studies which are 
included in the application.
5.  The proposed process for reviewing and selecting future pilot/feasibility 
studies.  

Research Mentoring Core

1.  Evidence of a strong commitment to, and plans to help foster and 
facilitate, the research career development of minority students and faculty.
2.  The adequacy of plans to facilitate and monitor the research career 
trajectory and productivity of participants at both institutions.
3.  The appropriateness of plans for assisting faculty and students in 
developing cultural competence in nursing research. 
4.  The adequacy of plans to identify and address ethical concerns related 
to conducting health disparities research. 
5.  Evidence of a sufficient number of potential research mentoring 
participants who will utilize these core resources.
6.  The qualifications of the Director (and Co-Director if applicable) of the 
Research Mentoring Core. 

Research Outreach/Dissemination Core (Optional)
 
1.  The adequacy of plans for establishing, sustaining, and evaluating 
research-related outreach with targeted communities.
2.  A plan for disseminating health disparities research findings to 
participants, community groups, and lay and professional audiences
3.  The qualifications of the Director (and Co-Director if applicable) of the 
Research Outreach and Dissemination Core.

Pilot/Feasibility Studies 

1.  The scientific merit of the research proposed and the importance of the 
information sought to the mission of the NINR.
2.  How well the pilot/feasibility study addresses a minority health or 
health disparities topic. 
3.  The justification for eligibility of the investigator(s) according to 
criteria listed in the RFA.
4.  The feasibility and promise of the proposed methods.
5.  The novelty or originality of the proposed study.
6.  The training, experience, and research competence of the investigator(s).
7.  The suitability of the facilities for the proposed research, including 
the availability of required special resources.
8.  The appropriateness and justification of the requested budget for the 
proposed work.
9.  Provisions for the protection of human subjects and the humane care of 
animals.
10.  The inclusion of participants from each partnering institution.

In addition to the above criteria, in accordance with NIH policy, all 
applications will also be reviewed with respect to the following:

o The adequacy of plans to include both genders, minorities and their 
subgroups, and children as appropriate for the scientific goals of the 
research.  Plans for the recruitment and retention of subjects will also be 
evaluated.

o The reasonableness of the proposed budget and duration in relation to the 
proposed research.

o The adequacy of the proposed protection for humans, animals and the 
environment, to the extent they may be adversely affected by the project  
proposed in the application.

Schedule

Letter of Intent Receipt Date:    April 15, 2002
Application Receipt Date:         May 13, 2002
Peer Review Date:                 June/July 2002
Council Review:                   September 2002
Earliest Anticipated Start Date:  September 30, 2002

AWARD CRITERIA

Award criteria that will be used to make award decisions include:

o scientific merit (as determined by peer review)
o availability of funds
o programmatic priorities.

INQUIRIES

Inquiries concerning this RFA are encouraged.  The opportunity to clarify any 
issues or answer questions from potential applicants is welcome.

Direct inquiries regarding programmatic issues to:

Dr. Janice Phillips
Program Director
Office of Extramural Programs
National Institute of Nursing Research
Building 45, Room 3AN-12
45 Center Drive, MSC 6300
Bethesda, MD  20892-6300
Tel:  (301) 594-6152
Fax:  (301) 480-8260
E-mail:  phillipsj@mail.nih.gov

Direct inquiries regarding review issues to:

Dr. John E. Richters 
Chief, Office of Review 
National Institute of Nursing Research
Building 45, Room 3AN-12
45 Center Drive, MSC 6300
Bethesda, MD  20892-6300
Telephone:  (301) 594-5971 
FAX:  (301) 451-5645
e-mail:  jrichters@nih.gov

Direct inquiries regarding fiscal matters to:

Ms. Cindy McDermott
Chief Grants Management Officer
National Institute of Nursing Research
Building 45, Room 3AN-12
45 Center Drive, MSC 6300
Bethesda, MD  20892-6300
Telephone:  (301) 594-6869 
FAX:  (301) 451-5648
e-mail:  mcdermoc@mail.nih.gov

AUTHORITY AND REGULATIONS

This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No. 
93.361.  Awards are made under authorization of Sections 301 and 405 of the 
Public Health Service Act as amended (42 USC 241 and 284) and administered 
under NIH grants policies and Federal Regulations 42 CFR 52 and 45 CFR Parts 
74 and 92.  This program is not subject to the intergovernmental review 
requirements of Executive Order 12372 or Health Systems Agency review.

The PHS strongly encourages all grant recipients to provide a smoke-free 
workplace and promote the non-use of all tobacco products.  In addition, 
Public Law 103-227, the Pro-Children Act of 1994, prohibits smoking in 
certain facilities (or in some cases, any portion of a facility) in which 
regular or routine education, library, day care, health care, or early 
childhood development services are provided to children.  This is consistent 
with the PHS mission to protect and advance the physical and mental health of 
the American people.


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