AIDS INTERNATIONAL TRAINING AND RESEARCH PROGRAM 

RELEASE DATE:  October 31, 2002 
 
PA NUMBER: PA-03-018 (This PA has been reissued, see PAR-05-140)
                     (see addenda NOT-TW-03-001, NOT-TW-03-002, NOT-TW-03-006)

EXPIRATION DATE:  October 25, 2005, unless reissued. 

LETTER OF INTENT RECEIPT DATE:  March 12 

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE:   June 10, 2003; June 10, 2004, June 10, 2005
                                           
Fogarty International Center (FIC)
 (http://www.nih.gov/fic)
National Cancer Institute (NCI) 
 (http://www.nci.nih.gov)
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) 
 (http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov)
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) 
 (http://www.niaid.nih.gov/)
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) 
 (http://www.nidcr.nih.gov)
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) 
 (http://www.nimh.nih.gov/)
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) 
 (http://www.ninr.nih.gov/)
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) 
 (http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/)
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) 
 (http://www.nida.nih.gov/)
Office of AIDS Research (OAR) 
 (http://www.nih.gov/od/oar/index.htm)
Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) 
 (http://www4.od.nih.gov/orwh/) 

THIS PA CONTAINS THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION

o Purpose of the PA
o Program Objectives
o Mechanism(s) of Support
o Eligible Institutions
o Individuals Eligible to Become Principal Investigators
o Special Requirements
o Where to Send Inquiries
o Submitting an Application
o Supplemental Instructions
o Peer Review Process
o Review Criteria
o Award Criteria
o Required Federal Citations

PURPOSE OF THIS PA

The purpose of this announcement is to invite applications from eligible 
institutions for innovative, collaborative training programs that would 
contribute to the long-term goal of building sustainable research capacity in 
HIV/AIDS and HIV-related conditions at developing country institutions.  
These research-training programs will strengthen scientific knowledge and 
skills to enhance prevention of and treatment and care for HIV/AIDS and HIV-
related conditions in developing countries.

The Fogarty International Center (FIC), together with partner Institutes and 
Offices from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has supported long-term 
research capacity-strengthening efforts in developing country institutions 
for the past 15 years through a series of competing five-year awards 
solicited through requests for applications (RFAs) for the AIDS International 
Training and Research Program (AITRP).  At this time, the Fogarty 
International Center (FIC) with its partners, the National Cancer Institute 
(NCI), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), the 
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Institute of 
Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), the National Institute of Mental 
Health (NIMH), the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), the 
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), the National 
Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the Office of AIDS Research (OAR), and the 
Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH), will solicit new and competing 
renewal applications and competing supplement applications to existing grants 
for AITRP under this program announcement.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

Background: 

As the global HIV/AIDS epidemic enters its third decade, the toll it has 
taken on individuals' lives is felt around the world.  While currently, the 
affected populations are primarily in sub-Saharan Africa, HIV epidemics in 
China, India, other south Asian countries, Russia and the Newly Independent 
States are increasing.  Progress to identify interventions to prevent the 
transmission of the infection through sexual contact, from mother to child, 
and through needle use has been made, but additional interventions to prevent 
transmission are needed if we expect to stem the tide of the epidemic.  
Effective interventions to prevent the transmission of HIV and other 
pathogens through unsafe blood and the inappropriate use of transfusion, such 
as appropriate programs for the recruitment and retention of volunteer 
donors; effective surveillance for established and emerging potential 
pathogens, and strategies to promote the rationale use of blood, continue to 
be needed and promoted.

As attention turns toward integration and expansion of care and treatment of 
HIV and HIV-related conditions into existing prevention programs, 
identification of effective interventions will be crucial to a country's 
ability to respond adequately.  The capacity to conduct integrated prevention 
and care research across the full range of conditions and issues that relate 
to care of adult and pediatric patients with HIV/AIDS (e.g., opportunistic 
infections, HIV malignancies, neurological and mental health consequences, 
behavioral issues, issues related to mother to child transmission, 
hematological and cardiovascular conditions, blood safety issues, pulmonary 
manifestations, ophthalmologic manifestations, gastrointestinal conditions, 
drug and alcohol usage, sex/gender-related science and issues, and oral 
health manifestations) need to be strengthened and expanded in developing 
countries.  In addition to the identification of effective interventions, the 
ability to evaluate the economic and social impacts of these interventions 
will be crucial to guide policy makers as they develop policies and programs 
to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic in their countries.

This program will increase research training across the span of biomedical, 
behavioral and social sciences, clinical science, epidemiology, 
biostatistics, and public health practice.  The research-training program 
should continue to emphasize prevention research and expand to include 
research to identify appropriate interventions to provide care to those 
adults and children infected with HIV.  It should involve a wide range of 
professionals (e.g. nurses, midwives, physicians, dentists, health care 
administrators and public health workers), and should be multidisciplinary, 
including training across the span of sciences and disciplines listed above. 

Research Training Objectives

Research-training programs should provide a variety of short-, medium- and 
long-term training opportunities for participants from developing country 
institution(s) within the context of ongoing research collaborations.  
Applications should present an assessment of the specific needs for HIV/AIDS 
and HIV-related research training at their collaborating developing country 
institution(s) and a proposed training plan to address those needs during the 
course of a five-year award.  It is expected that each research-training 
program award supported will:
o  Increase the expertise of trainees in relevant biomedical, behavioral, 
laboratory, clinical, epidemiological and/or social science research;
o  Fill gaps and strengthen the sustainability of HIV/AIDS and HIV-related 
research within developing country institution(s);
o  Expand and equalize collaborative scientific research interactions between 
developing country scientists and U.S. or potentially other developed country 
researchers;
o  Provide data for evidence-based decision-making related to HIV/AIDS and 
HIV-related conditions with respect to prevention, care and treatment 
policies in the host developing country;
o  Take advantage of other sources of research and training support in the 
foreign country; 
o  Actively work with collaborating country institutions and government 
officials within the collaborating country to provide opportunities and 
positions for all returning trainees to maximize the use of the knowledge and 
skills they acquired during their training; and
o  Strengthen the capacity of developing country institutions to compete for 
current and future NIH and non-NIH research and other grants designed for 
foreign institutions.

Existing and re-competing AITRP applications may include applications for 
competing supplements for up to the numbers of years of the existing or re-
competing parent grant for the following purposes:
o  Expanding their training programs geographically to institutions without 
existing AITRP collaborations in India or China;
o  Expanding their training programs geographically to institutions with 
which they have existing or the potential for strong AITRP collaborations;
o  Expanding their training programs in their emphasis country(ies) to take 
advantage of existing Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR), AIDS Clinical Trials 
Group (ACTG), and Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group (PACTG) grants at 
their institution;
o  Expanding their training program to respond to existing needs or 
opportunities related to the research areas of co-sponsoring NIH Institutes, 
Centers or Offices;
o  Supporting U.S. graduate or medical students and postdoctoral fellows for 
research training at the collaborating developing country institution.

Beginning with awards funded under this PA, grantees may submit competing 
supplement applications for up to three years of support for advanced in-
country re-entry support to establish independent research projects at the 
developing country institution for developing country participants who have 
completed substantial medium-and long-term research training.  Eligibility 
for these supplements will be limited to trainees who have received a degree 
or advanced skill training for at least six months continuous duration 
through the AITRP program submitting the competing supplement application.  
See Supplemental Instructions for additional instruction for competing 
supplement applications for this purpose.  The competing supplement 
application process also may be used for degree-required and mentored trainee 
research projects which are not part of an existing NIH research award and 
which require additional independent peer review.

Training may occur in either the U.S. or developing country institution.  
However, applicants are strongly encouraged to provide support and mentoring 
for trainees to conduct the research related to their training in the host 
developing country to the greatest extent possible.  Applicants should 
include plans that demonstrate the increasing transfer of appropriate 
training options and responsibilities to the developing country institution 
during the course of the five-year award.

Additional support for research training to support specific NIH initiatives 
(HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN), HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN), 
NIMH Popular Opinion Leader (POL) network, and Comprehensive International 
Program of Research on AIDS (CIPRA)) will be made administratively, as 
needed, based upon the peer-reviewed grants for these initiatives. 

MECHANISM OF SUPPORT 

This PA will use the NIH (D43) international research training award 
mechanism.  As an applicant, you will be solely responsible for planning, 
directing, and executing the proposed project.  An applicant for an AITRP 
award may request a project period of up to five years and a budget for total 
costs (including eight percent facilities and administrative (F & A) costs) 
according to the following guidelines:
o  For re-competing programs entering their sixteenth year of funding- $1 
million for base amount each year and up to $100,000 for each competing 
supplement for a maximum request of $1.3 million total costs for any year;
o  For re-competing programs entering their eleventh year of funding- 
$750,000 for base amount each year and up to $100,000 for each competing 
supplement for a maximum request of $1 million total costs for any year;
o  For re-competing programs entering their sixth year of funding- $500,000 
for base amount each year and up to $100,000 for each competing supplement 
for a maximum request of $650,000 total costs for any year; 
o  For new programs, $300,000 for base amount each year only.
o  For competing supplements to existing AITRP grants for advanced in-country 
research support – up to three years of $35,000 maximum total cost annual 
funding per supplemental application;
o  For competing supplements to existing AITRP grants for degree-required and 
mentored trainee research projects support – up to two years of $25,000 
maximum total cost annual funding per supplemental application;
o  For competing supplements to existing AITRP grants for expansion of 
research training support to new collaborating institutions – up to $100,00 
for a competing supplement application in each country for a maximum request 
of $200,000 total costs.

ELIGIBLE INSTITUTIONS 

Eligible institutions are U.S. (or pre-approved non-U.S. developed country) 
nonprofit, public or private institutions with HIV/AIDS and HIV-related 
research collaborations with institutions in the developing countries listed 
below.  A non-U.S. developed country applicant must provide documentation 
that their government or institution is willing to support at least 50 
percent of the requested budget per year for the full award period.  FIC will 
provide up to 50 percent of the total costs for a non-U.S. developed country 
applicant.

Developing countries include the low- and middle-income countries in the 
following regions:  Africa, Asia (except Japan, Singapore, South Korea and 
Taiwan), Central and Eastern Europe (Hungary, Poland, the Czech and Slovak 
Republics, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, Turkey and the countries of the former 
Yugoslavia), Russia and the Newly Independent States of the former Soviet 
Union, Latin America and the Caribbean, the Middle East (except Israel), and 
the Pacific Ocean Islands (except Australia and New Zealand).

Only one application for a base award may be submitted from an institution.  
Only one base award will be made to an institution at any given time.  More 
than one competing supplement application may be submitted by an institution 
applying for a re-competing base award or with an existing AITRP grant, as 
long as the budgets do not exceed the funding limits for total costs 
described above. 

INDIVIDUALS ELIGIBLE TO BECOME PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS

Any individual from an eligible institution with the skills, knowledge, and 
resources necessary to carry out the proposed international HIV/AIDS and HIV-
related research training is invited to work with their institution to 
develop an application for support.  U.S. (or pre-approved non-U.S.) 
applicants must apply with developing country institution(s) with whom they 
have a demonstrable history of HIV/AIDS and HIV-related research 
collaboration.

Applicants must have a strong HIV/AIDS and HIV-related research and research-
training program and the requisite faculty and facilities to carry out the 
proposed training activities.  The principal investigator and/or faculty at 
the applicant institution listed as key personnel must be designated as the 
principal investigator of at least one active (with at least 18 months of 
support remaining at the time of application) HIV/AIDS or HIV-related 
research award, directly relevant to the research-training proposed, funded 
by the NIH or other national or international organization.  Priority will be 
given to applicants associated with NIH direct research grants to the 
proposed collaborating developing country institution(s) or with research 
grants with foreign components at the collaborating developing country 
institution(s).  Applicants should explain in detail how their relevant 
research grant support and activities are related to the proposed training 
plan.  Applicants need to document this existing research support in their 
application.  

Women and individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, as well 
as individuals with disabilities, are always encouraged to apply for NIH 
programs.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

1.  Applications submitted in response to this announcement should describe 
the specific linkages that they can leverage to strengthen the capacity of 
the foreign institutions to collaborate with the National Institutes of 
Health (NIH), other United States Government (USG) agencies, and other 
international efforts by governments, international agencies, non-
governmental organizations, foundations, faith-based organizations and other 
groups in their efforts to respond to this global health crisis.  Letters of 
support and collaboration from awardees funded by these organizations are 
encouraged.

2.  Letters of support from foreign collaborators, foreign institutions, and 
developing country(ies) officials are required.  Letters of support from 
foreign institutions and governments should indicate support of trainees in 
the form of a position, time dedicated to research, laboratory space, 
financial support, etc. when they return.  Letters from groups with whom the 
applicant expects to collaborate are encouraged.

3.  Re-competing AITRP applicants should include a description of the 
activities of previous and current AITRP awards and include:
o  a description of the relevance of the research and public health training 
to the country's(ies') needs and priorities;
o  a description of how the AITRP grant has increased the research and public 
health capacity of the developing country institution(s);
o  a description of how the applicant has been able to leverage other NIH or 
non-NIH programs opportunities in the country(ies); 
o  the number of trainees by type of training for each collaborating country;
o  a list of publications in peer-reviewed journals in which a former or 
current trainee is listed as first author and which was supported through the 
AITRP grant as evidenced by acknowledgement of FIC in the publication;
o  a description of how the program addressed the recruitment and support for 
women and socially disadvantaged groups within the population of the 
country(ies);
o  the percentage of long-term trainees (one year or more) who returned to 
the country following the completion of their training;
o  a description of the strategies used by the program to maximize the number 
of trainees who return to their country of origin upon completing their 
training.

4. Trainee research projects encompass research included as part of a degree-
directed training program, research undertaken as part of a mentored training 
experience or research supported as advanced in-country research for a 
completing trainee.  Trainee research projects may be part of existing 
faculty research grants from NIH or other research support agencies.  Degree-
required and mentored trainee research projects that have not been part of 
scientifically peer reviewed faculty research grants must be reviewed by the 
proposed training advisory group (see below), and may be required to be peer-
reviewed as a competing supplement to an AITRP award.  All advanced in-
country research must be peer reviewed as a competing supplement to an 
existing AITRP grant, or separately as an application to the FIC Global 
Health Research Initiative Program for New Foreign Investigators (GRIP) 
Program or to the Fogarty International Research Collaboration Award for 
HIV/AIDS (AIDS FIRCA) program 
(http://www.nih.gov/fic/programs/aidsfirc.html).  All training-related 
research must meet all USG regulations for animal welfare and protection of 
human subjects and receive approval from the Institutional Review Board or 
Ethics Committee at the US institution to which the AITRP award is made and 
the collaborating country institution. 

WHERE TO SEND INQUIRIES

We encourage your inquiries concerning this PA and welcome the opportunity to 
answer questions from potential applicants.  Inquiries may fall into three 
areas:  scientific/research, peer review, and financial or grants management 
issues.

o Direct your questions about scientific/research training issues to:

Jeanne McDermott
Division of International Training and Research
Fogarty International Center
National Institutes of Health
Building 31 Room B2C39
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 496-1492
FAX:  (301) 402-0779
Email:  mcdermoj@mail.nih.gov

o Direct your questions about peer review issues to: 

Elliot Postow 
Center for Scientific Review
National Institutes of Health
6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 4160
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  301 435-0911
FAX:  301-490-2327
Email:  postowe@csr.nih.gov

o Direct your questions about financial or grants management matters to:

Bruce Butrum
Grants Management Officer
Fogarty International Center
National Institutes of Health
Building 31, Room B2C29
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 451-6830
FAX:  (301) 594-1211
Email:  butrumb@mail.nih.gov

LETTER OF INTENT
 
Prospective applicants are asked to submit a letter of intent that includes 
the following information:

o Descriptive title of the proposed research or research training
o Name, address, and telephone number of the Principal Investigator
o Names of other key personnel 
o Participating institutions
o Number and title of this PA 

Although a letter of intent is not required, is not binding, and does not 
enter into the review of a subsequent application, the information that it 
contains allows IC staff to estimate the potential review workload and plan 
the review.
 
The letter of intent is to be sent by the date listed at the beginning of 
this document.  The letter of intent should be sent to:

Jeanne McDermott CNM MPH Ph.D.
Division of International Training and Research
Fogarty International Center
National Institutes of Health
Building 31 Room B2C39
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 496-1492
FAX:  (301) 402-0779
Email:  mcdermoj@mail.nih.gov

SUBMITTING AN APPLICATION

Applications must be prepared using the PHS 398 research grant application 
instructions and forms (rev. 5/2001).  The PHS 398 is available at 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/phs398/phs398.html in an interactive 
format.  For further assistance contact GrantsInfo, Telephone (301) 435-0714, 
Email: GrantsInfo@nih.gov.  Use the Institutional NRSA budget page of the PHS 
398 research grant application instructions and forms for the budgets for 
research training applications.  Each competing supplement should be 
submitted as a separate application.

SUPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR RESEARCH TRAINING APPLICATIONS

The research training application (25-page limit) should include:

1.  A needs assessment that details the specific scientific and research 
support (e.g. the use of scientific literature, scientific presentations, 
grant writing, bioinformatics, bioethics, good clinical practice, biosafety, 
data management, research administration and the management of intellectual 
property) needs at each of the developing country institutions included in 
the application; 
2.  A description of the training plan proposed to address the needs 
assessment. The training plan should include:
o  the goals, objectives and plan for meeting the objectives for the training 
program;
o  a description of how the proposed program will address the research needs 
and health priorities defined by the country;
o  a description of the types and mix of training proposed.   Applicants may 
propose a variety of research training options (long-, medium-, and short-
term, degree related or non-degree, and short courses/workshops).  Long-term 
research training includes studies leading to an advanced degree or a 
mentored post-advanced degree experience related to HIV/AIDS and HIV-related 
research.  Medium- and short-term training of up to several months may 
include specific research methods or other laboratory, clinical, or field 
skills related to HIV/AIDS and HIV-related research.   Courses for English as 
a second language, if necessary, are permitted.  Training may occur in either 
the U.S. or developing country institution.  However, applicants are strongly 
encouraged to provide support and mentoring for trainees to conduct the 
research related to their training in the host developing country to the 
greatest extent possible.  Applicants should include plans that demonstrate 
the increasing transfer of appropriate training options and responsibilities 
to the developing country institution during the course of the five-year 
award;
o  a description of the program for Training in Responsible Conduct of 
Research - Applicants are required to provide all medium- and long-term 
trainees with training in the responsible conduct of research.  For more 
information on this provision, see the NIH Guide for Grant and Contracts 
(volume 21, number 43 - http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-
files/not92-236.html);
o  a plan for recruitment, selection and evaluation of trainees, and a plan 
for post-training integration into the collaborating developing country 
institution's HIV/AIDS and HIV-related research.  Training may be offered to 
a wide range of developing country scientists, technical staff, 
administrators, clinicians and health professionals, public health 
professionals and social scientists to build a critical mass of researchers 
and support staff with the combined expertise and skills to conduct 
independent HIV/AIDS and HIV-related research.  Applicants are strongly 
encouraged to consider women and members of minority or socially 
disadvantaged populations in the collaborating developing country in the 
selection of trainees;
o  a description of the background of the research and training 
collaborations of the institutions, the principal investigators and of the 
faculty proposed to be the research-training partners, a description of the 
organizational structure at each institution that will be available for the 
proposed training program, and a description of the current and future 
research that will serve as the research base for the proposed training 
program at each proposed foreign institution;
3.  A description of a Training Advisory Group which is composed of expert 
U.S. and developing country faculty who are not directly involved in 
mentoring trainees and which should be established to assist in trainee 
selection, scientific review of trainee projects, and evaluation of trainee 
and training program progress.  Applicants should describe the composition 
and expertise of the proposed training advisory group, the responsibilities 
of the group and the processes for it to accomplish its responsibilities, 
including a detailed description of the procedures for scientific review of 
training-related research.

Re-competing research training applications should also include a description 
of the past experience of the grantee in AITRP (ten-page limit).  See SPECIAL 
REQUIREMENTS 3.

Budget Preparation for Research Training Applications

Use the Institutional NRSA budget page of the PHS 398 research grant 
application instructions and forms for the budgets for research training 
applications.  Applicants should develop a budget that reflects the resources 
necessary to implement the components of the comprehensive developing country 
training plan included in their application.  The budget should include costs 
to support the proposed research-training plan. 

All expenses related to trainee participation in the program should be 
itemized on the PHS Form 398 (NRSA substitute budget pages 4 & 5) in the 
appropriate categories.   All expenses related to faculty participation in 
the program should be itemized on the PHS Form 398 (budget form pages 4 and 
5) in the appropriate categories.  The total direct costs of the trainee 
participation budget should be identified on PHS Form 398 (budget form pages 
4 and 5) in the "Other" category.  The combining of the budgets will allow 
reviewers and FIC staff to review a composite budget of all costs.

Requested Salary Support
The salary for the Principal Investigator and other training faculty and 
administrative staff must be commensurate with the salary structure and 
benefits at the applicant institution.

Trainees' Stipends
Trainees may be paid a stipend comparable to their professional experience in 
accordance with NRSA levels or grantee institutional policies while involved 
in long-term training at the grantee institution.  Current NRSA stipend 
levels are described on the web site http://grants.nih.gov/training/nrsa.htm.  

Tuition, Fees and Insurance for Trainees
Funds for tuition, academic fees and self-only or family medical insurance 
may be requested.  Programs are encouraged to seek cost-sharing arrangements 
with the grantee institutions in order to provide reduced tuition for long-
term trainees and tuition-free short courses.

Network Meetings
Funds to support the attendance of the Principal Investigator and two to 
three other people (foreign collaborators, faculty, administrators or 
trainees) to attend an annual network meeting.

In-Country Activities
Before any funds can be expended for in-country trainee research project 
activities under this award, the grantee institution must document a 
collaborative research arrangement between the U.S. and foreign country 
institutions.  This can be documented through an endorsement from the 
Minister of Health or other appropriate foreign government official as well 
as from the collaborating institutions. 

SUPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPETING SUPPLEMENTS FOR TRAINEE RESEARCH 
PROJECTS SUPPORT

The total direct costs must be requested in accordance with the program 
guidelines and the modifications made to the standard PHS 398 application 
instructions described below.

The research plan included in the supplement application should answer these 
questions:
1)  What does the current or former trainee intend to do? 
2)  Why is the work important? 
3)  What has already been done? 
4)  How is the current or former trainee going to do the work?
5)  What form of mentoring will be available to help guide the proposed work?

It should provide the information needed to evaluate the application, using 
the Review Criteria for Competing Supplement Applications for Trainee 
Research Projects Support.

In addition, applications for advanced in-country research project support 
should include:
o  date that the current or former trainee has returned or expects to return 
to their home country;
o  a letter from the U.S. host institution, outlining the nature of the 
future collaborative relationship, and how the program supported, and/or will 
support, a continued collaboration with the investigator, using all 
appropriate resources;
o  a letter of support from the developing country institution to which the 
trainee is returning or has returned;
o  a description of the training the current or former trainee investigator 
received under the AITRP program, including dates of training; and
o  two letters of reference relating to the abilities of the current or 
former trainee investigator, specifically indicating the ability to become a 
leader in scientific pursuits.

Under Personnel, list all project personnel, including their names, percent 
of effort, and roles on the project.  For advanced in-country research 
projects, the current or former trainee is expected to devote at least 50 
percent of his/her total effort to this project and may only request support 
of up to 50 percent of his/her effort on this project.  Salary requests of 
collaborating developing country personnel should be commensurate with the 
salary structure at the collaborating developing country institution.  For 
degree-required and mentored trainee research projects, 100 percent of the 
stipend for a trainee may be requested.

Checklist:  This page should be completed and submitted with the application.  
Applications can request facilities and administrative (F&A) costs up to a 
maximum of eight percent.  Please see the web site 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-01-028.html for more 
information on the allowability of F&A costs for foreign and international 
organizations.

SENDING AN APPLICATION TO THE NIH:  Submit a signed, typewritten original of 
the application, including the checklist, and five signed photocopies in one 
package to:

Center for Scientific Review
National Institutes of Health
6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 1040, MSC 7710
Bethesda, MD  20892-7710
Bethesda, MD  20817 (for express/courier service)

APPLICATION PROCESSING:  Applications must be received by the application 
receipt date listed in the heading of this PA.  If an application is received 
after that date, it will be returned to the applicant without review.  The 
Center for Scientific Review (CSR) will not accept any application in 
response to this PA that is essentially the same as one currently pending 
initial review unless the applicant withdraws the pending application.  The 
CSR will not accept any application that is essentially the same as one 
already reviewed.  This does not preclude the submission of a substantial 
revision of an application already reviewed, but such application must 
include an introduction addressing the previous reviewers' comments.

PEER REVIEW PROCESS

Upon receipt, applications will be reviewed for completeness by the CSR, and 
responsiveness by the FIC and the co-sponsoring NIH Institutes, Centers and 
Offices.  Incomplete and/or non-responsive applications will be returned to 
the applicant.  

Applications will be evaluated for scientific and technical merit by an 
appropriate scientific review group convened by the CSR, in accordance with 
the standard NIH peer review procedures (http://www.csr.nih.gov/refrev.htm) 
with the review criteria stated below.  As part of the initial merit review, 
all applications will receive a written critique, and will be discussed, 
assigned a priority score, and receive a second level review by the FIC 
Advisory Board, and possibly by the Advisory Boards or Councils of the co-
sponsoring NIH Institutes, Centers and Offices.

REVIEW CRITERIA 

The goals of NIH-supported research are to advance our understanding of 
biological systems, improve the control of disease, and enhance health.  In 
the written comments, reviewers will be asked to discuss the following 
aspects of your application in order to judge the likelihood that the 
proposed training or research will have a substantial impact on the pursuit 
of these goals: 

o Significance
o Approach
o Innovation
o Investigator
o Environment
  
The scientific review group will address and consider each of these criteria 
in assigning your application's overall score, weighting them as appropriate 
for each application.  Your application does not need to be strong in all 
categories to be judged likely to have major scientific training impact and 
thus deserve a meritorious priority score.  For example, you may propose to 
carry out important research training that, by its nature, is not innovative 
but is essential to move a field forward.

Review Criteria for Applications for Research Training

Significance
o  The expected contribution of the research-training program described in 
the application to fill the identified gaps in HIV/AIDS and HIV-related 
research expertise at the developing country institution(s).
o  The expected ability of the proposed training plan to strengthen 
multidisciplinary approaches (biomedical, behavioral, social, and cultural) 
to research and public health in the country(ies). 
o  The expected potential of the developing country institution(s) to achieve 
independent and sustainable laboratory, clinical or public health HIV/AIDS 
and HIV-related research capacity through the proposed training efforts. 

Approach
o  The adequacy of the research training plan to achieve the proposed 
training objectives including:
a)  The adequacy of the proposed mix of long-, medium- and short-term 
training to achieve the goals of this PA;
b)  The ability of the trainee recruiting and selection process to capture 
the most qualified individuals and to include an adequate representation of 
men, women and ethnic minorities or socially disadvantaged population groups 
among the developing country trainees;
c)  The adequacy of the process for matching trainees to appropriate mentors 
that will promote acquisition of research skills and development of research 
projects to fill recognized gaps in expertise at the developing country 
institution(s);
d)  The adequacy of the plan to provide adequate training in sustainable 
research enhancing areas such as laboratory safety, responsible conduct of 
research, technical and grant writing, statistical methods, good clinical 
practice, medical informatics, English as a second language (if necessary), 
etc;
e)  The expected ability of the plan to maximize the return and integration 
of trainees into HIV/AIDS and HIV-related research at the developing country 
institution(s) to build sustainable research capacity;
f)  The adequacy of the method to monitor the long-term impact of the 
HIV/AIDS and HIV-related research training experience on the subsequent 
careers of the trainees, the HIV/AIDS and HIV-related research capacity at 
the developing country institution(s), and public health in the developing 
country(ies); and
g)  The capability of the system for the scientific peer review of training-
related research by the Training Advisory Group.

Innovation
o  The ability of the proposed training program to take advantage of the 
foreign institution's research infrastructure and of previous and current 
investments and support from FIC, NIH or other organizations.
o  The identification of innovative strategies for trainees to become 
actively involved in multidisciplinary HIV/AIDS and HIV-related research 
studies or intervention trials relevant to national health priorities 
conducted at the developing country institution(s).
o  The innovation in training strategies to produce a critical mass of 
independent HIV-AIDS and HIV-related researchers and sustainable research 
training by trainees at the developing country institution(s) at the end of 
the program.

Investigators
o  The qualifications of the Principal Investigator and foreign 
collaborator(s) to lead the identified faculty to participate as mentors in 
the proposed research training program.
o  The adequacy of the ongoing collaboration between the investigators and 
the institutions named in the applicant to provide a suitable framework in 
which the proposed training will occur.
o  The adequacy of research support for the investigators named in the 
application.  
o  The extent and effectiveness of previous research training efforts made by 
the applicant in the proposed developing countries.
o  For re-competing applications, the success of the applicant in 
strengthening the research capacity of the developing country institutions, 
as requested in number 3 under SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS.

Environment
o  The adequacy of the HIV/AIDS and HIV-related teaching and research 
facilities and other resources related to the overall training environment at 
the applicant and developing country institutions.
o  The strength of the U.S. and developing country institutional commitments 
to the proposed HIV/AIDS and HIV-related research training program, including 
research support at each developing country institution included in the 
application.  See letters of support as requested in number 2 under SPECIAL 
REQUIREMENTS.

Review Criteria for Competing Supplement Applications for Trainee Research 
Projects

Significance
o  The importance and priority of the problem that the study will address in 
the home country.
o  The ability of the results of the study to advance scientific knowledge 
and to enhance the research career of the trainee.
o  The expected effect of these studies on the concepts or methods that drive 
this field.

Approach
o  The development, integration and appropriateness of the conceptual 
framework, design, methods, and analyses.
o  The identification of potential problem areas and alternatives to address 
these problems.

Innovation
o  The application of novel concepts, approaches or methods.
o  The originality and innovation of the aims.
o  The expected ability of the project to develop new methodologies or 
technologies or establish a new paradigm.

Investigator
o  The appropriateness of the training of the investigator to carryout the 
project successfully.
o  The appropriateness of the project to the experience level of the trainee 
investigator and other researchers (if any).
o  The contribution of the project to the trainee investigator's career 
development. 
o  The strength of commitment for the trainee investigator demonstrated in 
the letters of support. 

Environment
o  The ability of the in-country scientific environment to contribute to the 
probability of success.
o  The ability of the proposed project to take advantage of unique features 
of the scientific environment or employ useful collaborative arrangements.

In addition, for advanced in-country research projects, there must be:
o  Evidence of institutional support and a convincing commitment by the home 
institution to support the investigator (e.g. to provide a research/academic 
appointment and partial salary support), and
o  Evidence of continuing commitment of the U.S. collaborating institution to 
further develop the career and research interests of the trainee investigator

ADDITIONAL REVIEW CRITERIA:  In addition to the above criteria, your 
application will also be reviewed with respect to the following:

PROTECTIONS:  The adequacy of the proposed protections for humans, animals, 
or the environment, to the extent they may be adversely affected by the 
project proposed in the application.

INCLUSION:  The adequacy of plans to include subjects from both genders, all 
racial and ethnic groups (and subgroups), and children as appropriate for the 
scientific goals of the research.  Plans for the recruitment and retention of 
subjects will also be evaluated.  (See Inclusion Criteria included in the 
section on Federal Citations, below.)

DATA SHARING:  The adequacy of the proposed plan to share data. 

BUDGET:  The reasonableness of the proposed budget and the requested period 
of support in relation to the proposed research.

AWARD CRITERIA

Applications submitted in response to a PA will compete for available funds 
with all other recommended applications.  The following will be considered in 
making funding decisions:  

o  Scientific merit of the proposed project as determined by peer review;
o  Availability of funds;
o  Relevance to program priorities of FIC and co-sponsoring organizations;
o  Contribution to other FIC- and NIH-funded activities; and
o  For competing research training supplements, the extent to which 
applicants devote a portion of their base budgets to activities requested in 
the competing supplement application

REQUIRED FEDERAL CITATIONS 

MONITORING PLAN AND DATA SAFETY AND MONITORING BOARD:  Research components 
involving Phase I and II clinical trials must include provisions for 
assessment of patient eligibility and status, rigorous data management, 
quality assurance, and auditing procedures.  In addition, it is NIH policy 
that all clinical trials require data and safety monitoring, with the method 
and degree of monitoring being commensurate with the risks (NIH Policy for 
Data Safety and Monitoring, NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, June 12, 
1998: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/not98-084.html).  

INCLUSION OF WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN CLINICAL RESEARCH:  It is the policy of 
the NIH that women and members of minority groups and their sub-populations 
must be included in all NIH-supported clinical research projects unless a 
clear and compelling justification is provided indicating that inclusion is 
inappropriate with respect to the health of the subjects or the purpose of the 
research.  This policy results from the NIH Revitalization Act of 1993 
(Section 492B of Public Law 103-43).

All investigators proposing clinical research should read the AMENDMENT "NIH 
Guidelines for Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical 
Research - Amended, October, 2001," published in the NIH Guide for Grants and 
Contracts on October 9, 2001 (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-
files/NOT-OD-02-001.html); a complete copy of the updated Guidelines are 
available at 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/women_min/guidelines_amended_10_2001.htm.  
The amended policy incorporates:  the use of an NIH definition of clinical 
research; updated racial and ethnic categories in compliance with the new OMB 
standards; clarification of language governing NIH-defined Phase III clinical 
trials consistent with the new PHS Form 398; and updated roles and 
responsibilities of NIH staff and the extramural community.  The policy 
continues to require for all NIH-defined Phase III clinical trials that:  a) 
all applications or proposals and/or protocols must provide a description of 
plans to conduct analyses, as appropriate, to address differences by 
sex/gender and/or racial/ethnic groups, including subgroups, if applicable; 
and b) investigators must report annual accrual and progress in conducting 
analyses, as appropriate, by sex/gender and/or racial/ethnic group 
differences.

INCLUSION OF CHILDREN AS PARTICIPANTS IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS:  
The NIH maintains a policy that children (i.e., individuals under the age of 
21) must be included in all human subjects research, conducted or supported 
by the NIH, unless there are scientific and ethical reasons not to include 
them.  This policy applies to all initial (Type 1) applications submitted for 
receipt dates after October 1, 1998.

All investigators proposing research involving human subjects should read the 
"NIH Policy and Guidelines" on the inclusion of children as participants in 
research involving human subjects that is available at 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/children/children.htm.

REQUIRED EDUCATION ON THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECT PARTICIPANTS:  NIH 
policy requires education on the protection of human subject participants for 
all investigators submitting NIH proposals for research involving human 
subjects.  You will find this policy announcement in the NIH Guide for Grants 
and Contracts Announcement, dated June 5, 2000, at 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-00-039.html.

HUMAN EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS (hESC):  Criteria for federal funding of research 
on hESCs can be found at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/stem_cells.htm and at 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-02-005.html.  Only 
research using hESC lines that are registered in the NIH Human Embryonic Stem 
Cell Registry will be eligible for Federal funding (see http://escr.nih.gov).  
It is the responsibility of the applicant to provide the official NIH 
identifier(s)for the hESC line(s)to be used in the proposed research.  
Applications that do not provide this information will be returned without 
review. 

PUBLIC ACCESS TO RESEARCH DATA THROUGH THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT:  The 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-110 has been revised to 
provide public access to research data through the Freedom of Information Act 
(FOIA) under some circumstances.  Data that are (1) first produced in a 
project that is supported in whole or in part with Federal funds and (2) 
cited publicly and officially by a Federal agency in support of an action 
that has the force and effect of law (i.e., a regulation) may be accessed 
through FOIA.  It is important for applicants to understand the basic scope 
of this amendment.  NIH has provided guidance at 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/policy/a110/a110_guidance_dec1999.htm.

Applicants may wish to place data collected under this PA in a public 
archive, which can provide protections for the data and manage the 
distribution for an indefinite period of time.  If so, the application should 
include a description of the archiving plan in the study design and include 
information about this in the budget justification section of the 
application.  In addition, applicants should think about how to structure 
informed consent statements and other human subjects procedures given the 
potential for wider use of data collected under this award.

URLs IN NIH GRANT APPLICATIONS OR APPENDICES:  All applications and proposals 
for NIH funding must be self-contained within specified page limitations.  
Unless otherwise specified in an NIH solicitation, Internet addresses (URLs) 
should not be used to provide information necessary to the review because 
reviewers are under no obligation to view the Internet sites.  Furthermore, 
we caution reviewers that their anonymity may be compromised when they 
directly access an Internet site.

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2010:  The Public Health Service (PHS) is committed to 
achieving the health promotion and disease prevention objectives of "Healthy 
People 2010," a PHS-led national activity for setting priority areas.  This 
PA is related to one or more of the priority areas.  Potential applicants may 
obtain a copy of "Healthy People 2010" at http://www.health.gov/healthypeople.

AUTHORITY AND REGULATIONS:  This program is described in the Catalog of 
Federal Domestic Assistance No. 93.989, and is not subject to the 
intergovernmental review requirements of Executive Order 12372 or Health 
Systems Agency review.  Awards are made under authorization of the Public 
Health Service Act, as amended (42 USC 241 and 287b) and administered under 
Public Health Service (PHS) grants policies described at 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/policy/policy.htm and under Federal Regulations 
42 CFR 52 and 45 CFR Parts 74 and 92. 

The PHS strongly encourages all grant recipients to provide a smoke-free 
workplace and discourage the use of all tobacco products.  In addition, 
Public Law 103-227, the Pro-Children Act of 1994, prohibits smoking in 
certain facilities (or in some cases, any portion of a facility) in which 
regular or routine education, library, day care, health care, or early 
childhood development services are provided to children.  This is consistent 
with the PHS mission to protect and advance the physical and mental health of 
the American people.


Weekly TOC for this Announcement
NIH Funding Opportunities and Notices


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