BIOENGINEERING NANOTECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE

Release Date:  December 2, 1999

PA NUMBER:  PA-00-018 (superceded by PA-02-125)

National Institute of Mental Health
National Cancer Institute
National Center for Research Resources
National Eye Institute
National Human Genome Research Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
National Institute on Aging
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism 
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Library of Medicine

Application Receipt Dates: April 1, August 1, and December 1 in the 
years 2000, 2001, and 2002.

PURPOSE

This Program Announcement (PA), issued as an initiative of the trans-NIH 
Bioengineering Consortium (BECON), invites grant applications for Small 
Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects on nanotechnologies useful to 
biomedicine.  Nanotechnology is defined as the creation of functional 
materials, devices and systems through control of matter at the scale of 1 to 
100 nanometers, and the exploitation of novel properties and phenomena at the 
same scale.  Nanotechnology is emerging as a field critical for enabling 
essential breakthroughs that may have tremendous potential for affecting 
biomedicine.  Moreover, nanotechnologies developed in the next several years 
may well form the foundation of significant commercial platforms.

In recognition of the nascence of this area, the duration and amounts of 
individual grants awarded under this PA may be greater than those routinely 
allowed under the SBIR program.  Few small businesses possess the highly 
specialized resources needed for nanoengineering.  Therefore, this PA 
encourages team approaches to research in the belief that a synergistic blend 
of expertise and resources may be needed to allow for stronger partnerships 
between the small businesses and other entities in Phase I than can be 
developed with the funds usually available through this program.  
Applications are encouraged from teams of investigators from commercial, 
academic and other sectors of the research community.  Partners to the small 
businesses may play important roles in these projects and may receive 
appropriate support for their efforts.  In addition to requiring 
collaboration from various sectors, it is expected that this initiative will 
require expertise from a variety of disciplines, including engineering, 
chemistry, physics, material science, engineering, and biology.

This PA will remain in effect for three years (a total of 9 receipt dates), 
at which time this initiative will be evaluated and a decision will be made 
as to whether the initiative will continue.

This PA must be read in conjunction with the Omnibus Solicitation of the 
Public Health Service (Omnibus Solicitation) for Phase I SBIR Grant 
Applications (PHS 2000-2) and the instructions for Phase II Grant 
Applications revised March 1998.  All instructions and information in these 
documents also apply to applications submitted in response to this PA except 
where otherwise noted below.

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2000

The Public Health Service (PHS) is committed to achieving the health 
promotion and disease prevention objectives of "Healthy People 2000," a PHS-
led national activity for setting priority areas.  This Program Announcement, 
Bioengineering Nanotechnology Initiative, is related to many priority areas.  
Potential applicants may obtain a copy of "Healthy People 2000" at 
http://odphp.osophs.dhhs.gov/pubs/hp2000/

ELIGIBILITY

Eligibility requirements are described in the Omnibus Solicitation.

MECHANISM OF SUPPORT - PHASE I

Phase I applications in response to this PA will be funded as Phase I SBIR 
Grants (R43) with modifications as described below. Responsibility for the 
planning, direction, and execution of the proposed research will be solely 
that of the applicant.  Applications for Phase I grants should be prepared 
following the directions for Phase I SBIR applications as described in the 
Omnibus Solicitation.  The Omnibus Solicitation is available on the Internet 
at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir1/SBIR.htm.

A limited number of hard copies of the Omnibus Solicitation are available 
from:

PHS SBIR/STTR Solicitation Office
13685 Baltimore Avenue
Laurel, MD  20707-5096
Telephone:  (301) 206-9385
FAX:  (301) 206-9722
Email:  a2y@cu.nih.gov

o  Project Period and Amount of Award

Because the duration and cost of research to develop nanotechnologies is 
likely to exceed that routinely awarded for SBIR grants, well-justified Phase 
I applications under this PA will be considered with a project period up to 
two years and a budget not to exceed a total cost of $400,000 (i.e., an 
average of $200,000 per year).

o  Consultant and contractual costs

Because the resources required for nanoengineering are relatively scarce, 
highly specialized, and multidisciplinary, the total amount of consultant 
costs and contractual costs requested by applicants may exceed the statutory 
guidelines.  Requests in excess of the guidelines must be fully justified. 

o  Page Limitations

The 25-page limitation for Phase I applications applies (see Omnibus 
Solicitation).

MECHANISM OF SUPPORT - PHASE II

Phase II applications in response to this PA will be awarded as Phase II SBIR 
grants (R44) with modifications as described below.  Phase II applications in 
response to this PA will only be accepted as competing continuations of 
previously funded NIH Phase I SBIR awards.  The previously funded Phase I 
award need not have been awarded under this PA but the Phase II proposal must 
be a logical extension of the Phase I research.

Applications for Phase II awards should be prepared following the 
instructions for NIH Phase II applications in the Omnibus Solicitation, which 
may be accessed electronically at 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir2/index.htm.

o  Project Period and Amount of Award

Because the duration and cost of research to develop nanotechnologies is 
likely to exceed that routinely awarded for SBIR grants, well-justified Phase 
II applications under this PA will be considered with a project period up to 
three years and a budget not to exceed a total cost of $1,200,000 (i.e., an 
average of $400,000 for each of three years).

o  Consultant and Contractual Costs

Because the resources required for nanoengineering are relatively scarce, 
highly specialized, and multidisciplinary, the total amount of consultant 
costs and contractual costs requested by applicants may exceed the statutory 
guidelines.  Requests in excess of the guidelines must be fully justified.

The Fast-Track initiative will not be utilized under this PA.

MECHANISM OBJECTIVES

The SBIR program consists of the following three phases:

o  Phase I

The objective of Phase I is to establish the technical merit and feasibility 
of the proposed research, or research and development efforts, and to 
determine the quality of performance of the small business grantee 
organization prior to providing further federal support in Phase II.

o  Phase II

The objective of this phase is to continue the research or research and 
development efforts initiated in Phase I.

o  Phase III

The objective of this phase, where appropriate, is for the small business 
concern to pursue the commercialization of the results of the research or 
research and development funded in Phases I and II.  Phase III occurs without 
SBIR funding.

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES

Background

Nearly half a century ago, the finest minds in physics disagreed as to 
whether it would ever be possible to manipulate individual atoms and 
electrons.  Today, the amount of nanoscale science and engineering is 
exploding because of the availability of new investigative tools.  These new 
analytical tools are capable of probing the nanometer world and will make it 
possible to characterize chemical and mechanical properties of cells, 
discover novel phenomena and processes, and provide science with a wide range 
of tools, materials, devices, and systems with unique characteristics.  For 
example, complementing optical traps and tweezers, nanoscale carbon cones are 
ideal probe tips for scanning microscopy, and could be used to better 
understand the structure of biomolecules.  Carbon nanotubes with bioactive 
tips could be used to serve as chemically-selective grips for particular, 
individual molecules.  This capability could be used, in turn, to manipulate 
and observe directly interactions between individual molecules (e.g., 
proteins) and to detect different biological agents and pathogens thus 
revolutionizing the use of probe microscopy in chemistry and biology.  
Indeed, by using diverse tools and concepts such as scanning probe 
manipulators, nanolithography, logic circuits based on quantum dots, and 
self-assembling molecular properties, it should be possible to arrange 
individual atoms and molecules in space with great precision, leading to the 
fabrication of truly smart biosensors.

On the other hand, complex biological systems provide models from which to 
design components that can be brought together to form three-dimensional 
nanostructured systems.  For example, the properties of DNA to undergo highly 
controlled and hierarchical assembly makes it ideal for applications in 
nanotechnology such as molecular sieves, or scaffolds for the assembly of 
molecular electronic components.  Likewise, eukaryotic rotary motors based on 
ATPase could be employed as generic engines driving other nanodevices for 
purposes such as highly directed delivery of drugs or other agents.

Eventually, by coupling advances in the knowledge of living systems with the 
unique capabilities imparted by nanostructures and materials, it may be 
possible to detect and intervene in disease states using biologically 
inspired solutions.  Integration of biocompatible materials with fluidics, 
optics, mechanical and electronic components, all at micro- to nano- scale, 
will enable development of implantable noninvasive sensing systems for the 
detection and prevention of disease at the earliest stages of its 
development.  Controlled release delivery systems will make possible delivery 
of both conventional and new, nanostructured drugs at targeted specific sites 
in the body, while nanoscale chemical and topographical details on the 
surface of implantable materials will mediate their reaction with the body.  
Nanotechnology promises scientific and commercial opportunities that are 
virtually unimaginable at this time.

Research Topics

Examples of general research topics that would be considered responsive to 
this PA are listed below.  This is not meant to be an exhaustive, exclusive 
or delimiting set of topics, rather these merely represent illustrations of 
projects that would be considered relevant to this PA.

o  Nanoplumbing components such as valves, microfluidic channels, and motors 
(e.g., to be used as pumps)

o  Logic circuits based on quantum dots, which carry out particular computing 
functions without current

o  Development and improvement of techniques based on new principles for 
probing biological properties and phenomena not well understood at the 
nanometer scale and for characterizing nanoscale materials

o  Development of fluorescent probes at the nanometer scale for monitoring 
biochemical processes on the surface and inside a cell in health and disease

o  Creation of "smart" nanostructured biocompatible materials.  Approaches 
may include self-assembling techniques and supramolecular chemistry for 
building up functional nanostructures and for modifying and patterning 
material surface texture

o  Development of nanofabricated barriers to prevent rejection of implantable 
materials

o  Development of nanoparticles and nanospheres that enable controlled 
released of therapeutic agents, antibodies, genes and vaccines into targeted 
cells

o  Development of sensor technologies for detection and analysis of 
biologically relevant molecular and physical targets in samples from blood, 
saliva and other body fluids, or for use in the research laboratory (purified 
samples), clinical specimens and in the living body.

INCLUSION OF WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

It is the policy of the NIH that women and members of minority groups and 
their subpopulations must be included in all NIH supported biomedical and 
behavioral research projects involving human subjects, unless a clear and 
compelling rationale and justification is provided that inclusion is 
inappropriate with respect to the health of the subjects or the purpose of 
the research.  This policy results from the NIH Revitalization Act of 1993 
(Section 492B of Public Law 103-43).

All investigators proposing research involving human subjects should read the 
"NIH Guidelines For Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical 
Research," which have been published in the Federal Register of March 28, 
1994 (FR 59 14508-14513) and in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, Vol. 
23, No. 11, March 18, 1994 available on the web at the following URL address: 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/not94-100.html

INCLUSION OF CHILDREN AS PARTICIPANTS IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

It is the policy of NIH that children (i.e., individuals under the age of 21) 
must be included in all human subjects research, conducted or supported by 
the NIH, unless there are scientific and ethical reasons not to include them.  
This policy applies to all initial (Type 1) applications submitted for 
receipt dates after October 1, 1998.

All investigators proposing research involving human subjects should read the 
"NIH Policy and Guidelines on the Inclusion of Children as Participants in 
Research Involving Human Subjects" that was published in the NIH Guide for 
Grants and Contracts, March 6, 1998, and is available at the following URL 
address: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/not98-024.html

Investigators also may obtain copies of these policies from the program staff 
listed under INQUIRIES.  Program staff may also provide additional relevant 
information concerning the policy.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

Applicants should follow the instructions for SBIR Phase I or Phase II 
submission with the modifications as noted in this PA.  Potential applicants 
are strongly encouraged to contact program staff for pre-application guidance 
and/or for more specific information on the research topics described in this 
PA.

Mailing Instructions

For purposes of identification and processing, the title and number of this 
PA must be shown in item 2 on the face page of the SBIR Phase I applications 
and in item 1A of the face page of Phase II grant applications (i.e., 
"BIOENGINEERING NANOTECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE," PA-00-018).

Follow the mailing instructions in the Omnibus Solicitation for Phase I 
applications.  Follow the mailing instructions in the Phase II application 
package for Phase II applications.

REVIEW CONSIDERATIONS

Review Procedures

Applications will be assigned on the basis of established PHS referral 
guidelines.  Upon receipt, applications will be reviewed for completeness by 
the NIH Center for Scientific Review.  Incomplete applications will be 
returned to the applicant without further consideration.

Applications will be reviewed for scientific and technical merit by review 
groups convened by the Center for Scientific Review, NIH, in accordance with 
the standard NIH peer review procedures.  As part of the initial merit 
review, all applications will receive a written critique and undergo a 
process in which only those applications deemed to have the highest 
scientific merit, generally the top half of the applications under review, 
will be discussed, assigned a priority score, and receive a second level 
review by the appropriate national advisory council.

Review Criteria

Review criteria are described in the Omnibus Solicitation.  The Phase I 
application should specify clear, measurable goals (milestones) that should 
be achieved prior to initiating Phase II.  Failure to provide clear, 
measurable goals may be sufficient reason for the study section to judge the 
application non-competitive.

AWARD CRITERIA

The following will be considered when making funding decisions:  quality of 
the proposed project as determined by peer review, program balance among 
research areas of the program announcement, the availability of funds, and 
the commercialization status where the small business concern has received 
more than 15 Phase II awards in the prior five (5) fiscal years, if 
applicable (see this application requirement under "Prior SBIR Phase II 
Awards" found in the "Introduction and Application Instructions" portion of 
the Omnibus Solicitation).

Applications will compete for available funds with all other favorably 
recommended SBIR applications.  Note that applicants may achieve all Phase I 
goals and milestones and still not receive Phase II funding.

INQUIRIES

Written and telephone inquiries are encouraged.  The opportunity to clarify 
any issues or questions from potential applicants is welcome.

Inquiries regarding programmatic issues may be directed to:

NCI - Carol Dahl, Ph.D., National Cancer Institute, Building 31, Room 11A03, 
MSC 2590, Bethesda, MD  20892-2590, Telephone:  (301) 496-1550, FAX:  (301) 
496-7807, Email:  cd41x@nih.gov

NCRR - Richard Dubois, Ph.D., Biomedical Technology, National Center for 
Research Resources, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Room 61060, MSC 7965, Bethesda, MD  
20892-7965, Telephone:  (301) 435-0755, FAX:  (301) 480-3659, Email:  
rickard@ncrr.nih.gov

NEI - Ralph J. Helmsen, Ph.D., Research Resources Officer, National Eye 
Institute, Executive Plaza South, Suite 350, 6120 Executive Boulevard, MSC 
7164, Bethesda, MD  20892-7164, Telephone:  (301)-496-5301, FAX:  (301)-402-
0528, Email: rh27v@nih.gov 

NHGRI - Jeffery A. Schloss, Ph.D., Division of Extramural Research, National 
Human Genome Research Institute, Building 31, Room B2B07, MSC 2033,  
Bethesda, MD  20892-2033, Telephone:  (301) 496-7531, FAX:  (301) 480-2770, 
Email:  jeff_schloss@nih.gov

NHLBI - John T. Watson, Ph.D., Acting Deputy Director, National Heart, Lung, 
and Blood Institute, 9000 Rockville Pike, Room 5A49,  Bethesda, MD  20892, 
Telephone:  (301) 435-0513, FAX:  (301) 402-3686, Email:  jw53f@nih.gov

NIA - Evan Hadley, M.D., Geriatrics, National Institute on Aging, Gateway 
Building, Suite 3E327, MSC 9205, Bethesda, MD  20892-9205, Telephone:  (301) 
435-3044, FAX:  (301) 402-1784, Email:  hadleye@exmur.nia.nih.gov

NIAAA - Antonio Noronha, Ph.D., Division of Basic Research, National 
Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 6000 Executive Blvd., Suite 402, 
Bethesda, MD  20892-7003, Telephone: (301) 443-7722, Fax: (301) 594-0673, 
Email: anoronha@willco.niaaa.nih.gov

NIAID - Vicki Seyfert, Ph.D., National Institute of Allergy and Infectious 
Diseases, 6003 Executive Boulevard, Room 4A21, Rockville, MD  20852, 
Telephone:  (301) 496-7551, FAX:  (301) 402-2571, Email:  vs62y@nih.gov

NIAMS - James S. Panagis, M.D., M.P.H., Musculoskeletal Diseases Branch, 
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, 6500 
Center Drive, Room 5AS-37K, Bethesda, MD  20892-6500, Telephone:  (301) 594-
5055, FAX:  (301) 480-4543, Email:  jp149d@nih.gov

NICHD - Louis A. Quatrano, Ph.D., National Center for Medical Rehabilitation 
Research, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Building 
61E, Room 2A03, Bethesda, MD  20892-7510, Telephone:  (301) 402-2242, FAX:  
(301) 402-0832, Email:  lq2n@nih.gov

NIDA - Thomas G. Aigner, Ph.D., Division of Basic Research, National 
Institute on Drug Abuse,  6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 4282, MSC 9555, 
Bethesda, MD 20892-9555, Telephone:  (301) 443-6975, FAX:  (301) 594-6043, 
Email:  ta17r@nih.gov

NIDCD - Lynn E. Luethke, Ph.D., National Institute on Deafness and Other 
Communication Disorders, 6120 Executive Boulevard, MSC 7180, Bethesda, MD 
20892-7180, Telephone:  (301) 402-3458, FAX:  (301) 402-6251, Email:  
lynn_luethke@nih.gov

NIDDK - Joan T. Harmon, Ph.D., Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and 
Metabolic Diseases, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney 
Diseases, 45 Center Drive, Room 5AN-18G, MSC 6600, Bethesda, MD 20892-6600, 
Telephone:  (301) 594-8813, FAX:  (301) 480-3503, Email:  
HarmonJ@extra.niddk.nih

NIDCR - Eleni Kousvelari, D.D.S., D.Sc.,  Chief - Biomaterials, Biomimetics, 
and Tissue Engineering Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial 
Research, Natcher Building, Room 4AN 18A, MSC 6402, Bethesda, MD 20892-6402, 
Telephone:  (301) 594-2427, FAX:  (301) 480-8318, Email:  
kousvelari@de45.nidr.nih.gov

NIEHS - Dr. Jerrold Heindel, Division of Extramural Research and Training, 
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, PO Box 12233, Mail Drop 
EC-23, Research Triangle Park,  NC  27709, Telephone:  (919) 541-0781, FAX:  
(919) 541-5064, Email:  heindelj@niehs.nih.gov

NIGMS - Warren Jones, Ph.D., Division of Pharmacology, Physiology and 
Biological Chemistry, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, 45 
Center Drive, Room 2AS-43H, MSC 6200, Bethesda, MD  20892-6200, Telephone:  
(301) 594-5938, FAX:  (301) 480-2802, Email:  jonesw@nigms.nih.gov

NIMH - Michael F. Huerta, Ph.D., Associate Director, Division of Neuroscience 
and Basic Behavioral Science,  National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 
Executive Boulevard, Room 7202, MSC 9645, Bethesda, MD  20892-9645, 
Telephone:  (301) 443-3563, FAX:  (301) 443-1731, Email:  
mhuerta@helix.nih.gov

NINDS - William Heetderks, M.D., Ph.D., Division of Stroke, Trauma, and 
Neurodegenerative Disorders, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and 
Stroke, Neuroscience Center, Room 2207, Bethesda, MD  20892,  Telephone:  
(301) 496-1447, FAX:  (301) 480-1080,  Email:  Heet@nih.gov

NLM - Peter Clepper, Program Officer, National Library of Medicine, 6705 
Rockledge Drive, Suite 301, Bethesda, MD  20871, Telephone:  (301) 594-4882, 
FAX:  (301) 402-2952, Email:  clepper@nlm.nih.gov

Direct inquiries regarding fiscal matters to:

NCI - Bill Wells, Grants Administration Branch, National Cancer Institute, 
6120 Executive Boulevard, Room 243, MSC 7150, Bethesda, MD  20892-7150, 
Telephone:  (301) 496-7800, FAX:  (301) 496-8601, Email:  
wellsw@gab.nci.nih.gov

NCRR - Joellen Harper, Office of Grants Management, National Center for 
Research Resources, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Room 6086, MSC 7965, Bethesda, MD  
20892-7965, Telephone:  (301) 435-0844, FAX:  (301) 402-3777, Email:  
harperj@ncrr.nih.gov

NEI – William Darby, Grants Management Officer, National Eye Institute, 6120 
Executive Boulevard, Suite 350, MSC 7164, Bethesda, MD  20892-7164, 
Telephone:  (301) 496-5884, FAX:  (301) 402-0528 

NHGRI - Jean Cahill, Grants Management Office, National Human Genome Research 
Institute, Building 31, Room B2B34,  31 Center Drive,  MSC 2030,  Bethesda, 
MD 20892-2030, Telephone:  (301) 402-0733, FAX:  (301) 402-1951, Email:  
jean_cahill@nih.gov

NHLBI -  Jane Davis, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 
Rockledge Drive, Room 7174, Bethesda, MD  20892, Telephone:  (301) 435-0166, 
FAX:  (301) 480-3310, Email: jd53f@nih.gov

NIA - Joseph Ellis, Grants and Contracts Management Officer, National 
Institute on Aging, Gateway Building, Suite 2N212, Bethesda, MD  20892, 
Telephone:  (301) 496-1472, FAX:  (301) 402-3672, Email:  
ellisj@exmur.nia.nih.gov

NIAAA - Ms. Linda Hilley, Grants Management Officer, National Institute on 
Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 6000 Executive Blvd., Suite 504, Bethesda, MD   
20892-7003,  Telephone: (301) 443-4704, Fax: (301) 443-3891, Email: 
lh67b@nih.gov

NIAID - Linda Shaw, Grants Management Branch, National Institute of Allergy 
and Infectious Diseases, 6003 Executive Boulevard, Room 4B-31, Rockville, MD  
20850, Telephone:  (301) 402-6611, FAX:  (301) 480-3780, Email:  
ls15k@nih.gov

NIAMS - Sally A. Nichols, Grants Management Branch, National Institute of 
Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, 6500 Center Drive, Room 5AS-
49F, Bethesda, MD  20892-6500, Telephone:  (301) 594-3535, FAX:  (301) 480-
5450, Email:  nicholss@mail.nih.gov

NICHD - Mary Ellen Colvin, Grants Management Branch, National Institute of 
Child Health and Human Development, Building 61E, Room 8A17, Bethesda, MD  
20892-7510, Telephone:  (301) 496-1303, FAX:  (301) 402-0915, Email:  
MC113B@nih.gov

NIDA - Gary Fleming, J.D., M.A., Grants Management Branch, National Institute 
on Drug Abuse, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 3131, MSC 9541, Bethesda, MD 
20892-9541, Telephone:  (301) 443-6710, FAX:  (301) 594-6847, Email:  
gf6s@nih.gov

NIDCD - Sharon Hunt, Grants Management Branch, National Institute on Deafness 
and Other Communication Disorders, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Room 400-C, MSC 
7180, Bethesda, MD  20892-7180, Telephone:  (301) 402-0909, FAX:  (301) 402-
1758, Email:  sharon_hunt@nih.gov

NIDDK - Nancy Dixon, Grants Management Officer, National Institute of 
Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 45 Center Drive, Room 6AS49K, MSC 
6600, Bethesda, MD  20892-6600, Telephone:  (301) 594-8854, FAX:  (301) 480-
4237, Email:  dixonn@extra.niddk.nih.gov

NIDCR - Kevin Crist, Division of Extramural Research, National Institute of 
Dental and Craniofacial Research, Natcher Building, Room 4AS 55, Bethesda, MD  
20892-6402, Telephone:  (301) 594-4800, FAX:  (301) 480-8301, Email:  
Kevin.Crist@nih.gov

NIEHS – Dorothy Duke, Division of Extramural Research and Training, National 
Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, Mail Drop EC-22, 
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709, Telephone:  (919) 541-1373, FAX:  (919) 
541-2860, Email:  Duke3@niehs.nih.gov

NIGMS - Antoinette Holland, Grants Management Specialist, National Institute 
of General Medical Sciences, 45 Center Drive, Room 2AN-50B, MSC 6200, 
Bethesda, MD  20892-6200, Telephone:  (301) 594-5132, FAX:  (301) 480-2554, 
Email:  hollanda@nigms.nih.gov

NIMH - Michael J. Loewe, Grants Management Specialist, National Institute of 
Child Health and Human Development (Service Center for NIMH), 6100 Executive 
Boulevard, Room 8A17J, 6100 Executive Boulevard MSC 7510, Bethesda Maryland 
20892-7510, Telephone: (301) 435-7008, FAX: (301) 402-0915, email: 
ml70m@nih.gov 

NINDS - Brenda Kibler, Grants Management Specialist, National Institute of 
Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Federal Building, Room 1004, Bethesda, MD  
20892, Telephone:  (301) 496-7441, FAX:  (301) 402-0219, Email:  
bk29j@nih.gov

NLM - Dwight Mowery, Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine, 6705 
Rockledge Drive, Suite 301, Bethesda, MD  20871, Telephone:  (301) 496-4221, 
FAX:  (301) 402-2952, Email:  moweryd@mail.nlm.nih.gov

AUTHORITY AND REGULATIONS

This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Nos. 
93.394, 93.395, 93.396, 93.306, 93.867, 93.172, 93.837, 93.838, 93.839, 
93.866, 93.273, 93.855, 93.856, 93.846, 93.864, 93.865, 93.929, 93.279, 
93.173, 93.121, 93.847, 93.848, 93.849, 93.113, 93.821, 93.859, 93.862, 
93.242, 93.853, 93.854, 93.361, and 93.879.  Awards are made under 
authorization of the Public Health Service Act, Sec. 301, Title IV, Part A 
(Public Law 78-410, as amended by Public Law 99-158, 42 USC 241 and 285).  
Awards will be administered under PHS grants policies and Federal Regulations 
42 CFR Part 52 and 45 CFR Part 74 and Part 92. This program is not subject to 
the intergovernmental review requirements of Executive Order 12372 or Health 
Systems review.  Awards will be administered under PHS grants policy as 
stated in the NIH Grants Policy Statement (October 1, 1998).

The PHS strongly encourages all grant and contract recipients to provide a 
smoke- free workplace and promote the non-use of all tobacco products.  In 
addition, Public Law 103-227, the Pro-Children Act of 1994, prohibits smoking 
in certain facilities (or, in some cases, any portion of a facility) in which 
regular or routine education, library, day care, health care or early 
childhood development services are provided to children.  This is consistent 
with the PHS mission to protect and advance the physical and mental health of 
the American people.



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